The primary objective of this NADIA core is to integrate and expand the Consortium research projects. The hypothesis of the Scientific Core is that adolescent intermittent ethanol (AIE) impacts brain development and induces specific neuro-adaptations that persist into adulthood as a specific neurochemical and morphological phenotype. Thus, the Scientific Core will serve and link NADIA components by providing neurochemical and morphological brain atlases that will define the phenotype of the brain exposed to alcohol during adolescence. Each component will send brains to the core for immunohistochemical determination of pivotal neurotransmitter gene expression in brain regions related to the physiology and behaviors being studied. Additionally, Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) and Diffusion Tensor Imaging (DTI) data will be collected on select data sets in order to provide global structural information on the impact of different AIE models on adult brain. Finally, all the resulting data will be shared and unused brain tissue will be archived to allow for future analysis. Together, these approaches will provide critical information on neurobiological mechanisms that underlie AlE-induced changes in adult behavior and physiology. The Scientific Core will use an animal model of adolescence alcohol drinking to investigate how alcohol changes brain structure and neurochemistry. This endeavor, along with the resulting data repository, serves to integrate the research components of the NADIA Consortium and will provide a foundation for understanding differences in adolescent life trajectories and maturation of important behavioral repertoires.

Public Health Relevance

The Scientific Core will use an animal model of adolescence alcohol drinking to investigate how alcohol changes brain structure and neurochemistry. This endeavor, along with the resulting data repository, serves to integrate the research components of the NADIA Consortium and will provide a foundation for understanding differences in adolescent life trajectories and maturation of important behavioral repertoires.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
Type
Resource-Related Research Projects--Cooperative Agreements (U24)
Project #
5U24AA020022-04
Application #
8525263
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAA1-DD (11))
Program Officer
Bechtholt-Gompf, Anita
Project Start
2010-09-01
Project End
2015-08-31
Budget Start
2013-09-01
Budget End
2014-08-31
Support Year
4
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$408,311
Indirect Cost
$132,425
Name
University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
Department
Pharmacology
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
608195277
City
Chapel Hill
State
NC
Country
United States
Zip Code
27599
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