Central to the accuracy and reliability of any animal study is the caliber and consistency of the animals'husbandry and health monitoring. The importance of these matters is heightened in the context of a service center such as the UC MMPC, which receives mice with a wide variety of genetic and/or nutritional challenges from many different investigators and institutions. Also central to MMPC function and investigator satisfaction is efficient and effective communication of information between LAMS facility personnel at the investigator and Center institutions so as to expedite the transfer of investigators'animals for phenotype analysis in a timely manner. Thus Core B, Animal Care and Husbandry, remains a critical part of the UC MMPC, as it has been since the Center's inception in 2001. There are three broad, long-range aims of this Core:
Specific Aim 1 : To coordinate and facilitate the transfer of animals from investigator's institutions to the University of Cincinnati Lab Animal Medicine Services (LAMS) Department and ultimately the UC MMPC housing area. Standard Operating Procedures of the UC MMPC and LAMS department for receiving animals from outside institutions are educated to our users.
Specific Aim 2 : To communicate with the UC LAMS and veterinary staff to select appropriate quarantine protocols for investigator mice upon receipt, and to jointly monitor the health and husbandry of the mice during the transition period from arrival to incorporation into the MMPC. The Animal Care and Husbandry Core also coordinates with the investigator to return (or destroy) animal carcasses after terminal procedures.
Specific Aim 3 : The Animal Care and Husbandry Core will continue to provide specialized husbandry service prior to delivery of mice to service Cores, as requested by specific investigators or Core Directors. These include administering specialized diets and monitoring weight gain, phlebotomy service for multiple tests, breeding service of mice such as when age-sensitive phenotypes are expected, and purchasing control mice from standard suppliers when necessary.

Public Health Relevance

Accuracy and reliability of any animal study is the caliber and consistency of the animals'husbandry and health monitoring as well as the efficient communication of information between LAMS facility personnel at the investigator and Center institutions. These are crucial for a service center which receives mice with a wide variety of genetic and/or nutritional challenges from many different investigators and institutions.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Diabetes and Digestive and Kidney Diseases (NIDDK)
Type
Resource-Related Research Projects--Cooperative Agreements (U24)
Project #
5U24DK059630-13
Application #
8517661
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZDK1-GRB-S)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-06-01
Budget End
2014-05-31
Support Year
13
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$123,184
Indirect Cost
$44,723
Name
University of Cincinnati
Department
Type
DUNS #
041064767
City
Cincinnati
State
OH
Country
United States
Zip Code
45221
Harley, Isaac T W; Stankiewicz, Traci E; Giles, Daniel A et al. (2014) IL-17 signaling accelerates the progression of nonalcoholic fatty liver disease in mice. Hepatology 59:1830-9
Wang, Fei; Kohan, Alison B; Dong, H Henry et al. (2014) Overexpression of apolipoprotein C-III decreases secretion of dietary triglyceride into lymph. Physiol Rep 2:e00247
Poole, Daniel P; Lee, Mike; Tso, Patrick et al. (2014) Feeding-dependent activation of enteric cells and sensory neurons by lymphatic fluid: evidence for a neurolymphocrine system. Am J Physiol Gastrointest Liver Physiol 306:G686-98
Tong, Jenny; Davis, Harold W; Summer, Suzanne et al. (2014) Acute administration of unacylated ghrelin has no effect on Basal or stimulated insulin secretion in healthy humans. Diabetes 63:2309-19
Li, Jibiao; Bi, Lipeng; Hulke, Michelle et al. (2014) Fish oil and fenofibrate prevented phosphorylation-dependent hepatic sortilin 1 degradation in Western diet-fed mice. J Biol Chem 289:22437-49
Li, Xiaoming; Xu, Min; Wang, Fei et al. (2014) Apolipoprotein A-IV reduces hepatic gluconeogenesis through nuclear receptor NR1D1. J Biol Chem 289:2396-404
Able, Jessica A; Liu, Yanhong; Jandacek, Ronald et al. (2014) Omega-3 fatty acid deficient male rats exhibit abnormal behavioral activation in the forced swim test following chronic fluoxetine treatment: association with altered 5-HT1A and alpha2A adrenergic receptor expression. J Psychiatr Res 50:42-50
Lo, Chunmin C; Davidson, W Sean; Hibbard, Stephanie K et al. (2014) Intraperitoneal CCK and fourth-intraventricular Apo AIV require both peripheral and NTS CCK1R to reduce food intake in male rats. Endocrinology 155:1700-7
McNamara, Robert K; Strimpfel, Jennifer; Jandacek, Ronald et al. (2014) Detection and Treatment of Long-Chain Omega-3 Fatty Acid Deficiency in Adolescents with SSRI-Resistant Major Depressive Disorder. PharmaNutrition 2:38-46
Nohara, Kazunari; Laque, Amanda; Allard, Camille et al. (2014) Central mechanisms of adiposity in adult female mice with androgen excess. Obesity (Silver Spring) 22:1477-84

Showing the most recent 10 out of 113 publications