Strategies to reduce cardiovascular disease (CVD) and diabetes burden and disparities require the adoption, dissemination and implementation of evidence-based strategies involving both clinical and community partners in alignment with a consistent set of goals that are advanced by multi-sector stakeholders, including front-line public health agencies, federal agencies, health providers and payors. The proposed application seeks to establish an innovative public-private partnership between the currently funded New York University (NYU) Prevention Research Center (PRC) and the City University of New York School of Public Health (CUNY SPH) that leverages existing collaborations in public health practice and research collaborations between partner institutions and their local, state, and federal public health agencies. The proposed NYU- CUNY PRC focuses on improving the health of communities at risk for CVD disparities through the adoption, dissemination and implementation of integrated, evidence-based community and clinical strategies to advance goals of the Million Hearts Initiative. Our focus will be on Asian and Hispanic American communities, which share commonalities related to immigration, migration, acculturation, language access, and cultural diversity. For the Core Research Project, the NYU-CUNY PRC is partnering with a large health plan to test integrated combinations of community health worker (CHW) models and electronic health record (EHR)-based clinical interventions for CVD prevention in South Asian communities, with an aim.to advance implementation of the Million Hearts Initiative. PRC research activities align with CDC strategic priorities of disseminating health systems interventions to improve the effective delivery and use of clinical and preventive services and improve community-clinical linkages. In addition, the PRC efforts will support efforts to improve physical activity and nutrition, a core component of the Million Hearts Initiatie and a CDC-defined winnable battle. The PRC also aligns with EHR intervention efforts by local and state public health agencies and incorporates a population health surveillance perspective. PRC activities will contribute to understanding of how best to reduce CVD health disparities in Asian and Latino American communities through research, community engagement and training involving the full range of public health practitioners, community partners, academic researchers, and students of public health and medicine. The NYU-CUNY PRC application harnesses the vast breadth of population health resources and expertise across NYC and builds upon the partner institutions'rich foundation of community engagement and strong governmental linkages to address cardiovascular prevention among diverse Asian and Hispanic communities.

Public Health Relevance

The proposed NYU-CUNY PRC focuses on improving the health of communities at risk for cardiovascular (CVD) disparities through the adoption, dissemination and implementation of evidence-based community and clinical strategies to advance goals of the U.S. Millions Hearts Initiative. Our focus is on Asian and Latino American communities, which share commonalities related to immigration, migration, acculturation, language access, and cultural diversity. The NYU-CUNY PRC application harnesses the vast breadth of population health resources and expertise across NYC and builds upon the partner institutions'rich foundation of community engagement and strong governmental linkages to address CVD prevention among Asian and Hispanic communities. The Core Research Project involves a partnership with a large health plan and aims to test strategies to advance implementation of the Million Hearts Initiative using integrated combinations of community health worker (CHW) models and electronic health record (EHR)-based clinical interventions for CVD prevention in South Asian communities.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Center for Chronic Disease Prev and Health Promo (NCCDPHP)
Type
Health Promotion and Disease Prevention Research Centers (U48)
Project #
1U48DP005008-01
Application #
8738801
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZDP1)
Project Start
2014-09-30
Project End
2019-09-29
Budget Start
2014-09-30
Budget End
2015-09-29
Support Year
1
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
New York University
Department
Internal Medicine/Medicine
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
City
New York
State
NY
Country
United States
Zip Code
10016
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