The SERCEB Mouse Monoclonal Antibody Core is housed within the Epitope Recogniton and Immunoreagent Core (ERIC) located at the University of Alabama at Birmingham. The core is responsible for the development and large-scale production of mouse Mabs for use by SERCEB members in studies relating to biodefense and emerging infectious diseases. Services provided by the facility include: procurement and housing of pathogen-free rodents, design and implementation of immunization strategies, sera testing, performance effusions and screening assays, specificity testing, cryopreservation of hybridoma lines, subcloning by limiting dilution, isotyping and large-scale production and purification of Mabs. To be of further service to SERCEB investigators, the core is extending its service to include biotyinylation and enzyme conjugation of Mabs. The Mouse Monoclonal Antibody Core has extensive experience in working with offsite investigators. The core has developed flexible protocols that provide investigators with extended periods of time for screening hybridoma supernatants off campus or in BSL3 facilites if necessary.

Public Health Relevance

The monoclonal antibodies produced in this core facility, will play a crucial role in the detection and characterization of infectious agents that are responsible for human disease. Furthermore, some of the antibodies produced in the core, may provide treatment strategies for infectious agents.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Type
Specialized Center--Cooperative Agreements (U54)
Project #
5U54AI057157-10
Application #
8375888
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAI1-DDS-M)
Project Start
2012-03-01
Project End
2014-02-28
Budget Start
2012-03-01
Budget End
2013-02-28
Support Year
10
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$165,375
Indirect Cost
$54,684
Name
University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
Department
Type
DUNS #
608195277
City
Chapel Hill
State
NC
Country
United States
Zip Code
27599
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