This overall goal of our Proposed Center is to use a physics-based approach towards understanding the evolution of cancer resistance. From an experimental point of view, this will be accomplished using the """"""""microhabitat patch"""""""" (MHP) technology developed on a microfluidic chip platform at Princeton. This, experimental technique is central to all aspects of our proposal as it allows us to experimentally """"""""tune"""""""" parameters which affect cell migration and evolution and then watch the evolution of interacting populations of cells as they move and evolve in space and time. The main focus of this proposed section of our Center is to rapidly extend this technology to mammalian cells (from initial studies in bacteria), and to develop additional capabilities for such MHP's for studying how cancer cells respond to stress. These include 2-dimensional or 3-dimenstional arrays in addition to 1-dimension, the ability to tune the coupling parameters between MHP's and between MHP's and food supplies as a function of time, and to adjust the local temperature as a function of time. We will also develop approaches for extracting cells from chips after evolution experiments for off-chip genomic analysis, and eventually methods for on-chip genomic analysis. Once these technologies and capabilities are invented and developed, they will be transferred to the Princeton Microfluidic Shared Resource (Section N4) so that all Center members (cancer biologists, e.g.) and external researchers such as those on pilot or transnetwork projects can use the new capabilities.

Public Health Relevance

The main focus of this proposed section of our Center is to rapidly extend this technology to mammalian cells (from initial studies in bacteria), and to develop additional capabilities for such MHP's for studying how cancer cells respond to stress.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Specialized Center--Cooperative Agreements (U54)
Project #
5U54CA143803-04
Application #
8382260
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZCA1-SRLB-9)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2012-08-01
Budget End
2013-07-31
Support Year
4
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$225,806
Indirect Cost
Name
Princeton University
Department
Type
DUNS #
002484665
City
Princeton
State
NJ
Country
United States
Zip Code
08544
Zarif, Jelani C; Yang, Weiming; Hernandez, James R et al. (2017) The Identification of Macrophage-enriched Glycoproteins Using Glycoproteomics. Mol Cell Proteomics 16:1029-1037
Parsana, Princy; Amend, Sarah R; Hernandez, James et al. (2017) Identifying global expression patterns and key regulators in epithelial to mesenchymal transition through multi-study integration. BMC Cancer 17:447
Decker, A M; Cackowski, F C; Jung, Y et al. (2017) Biochemical Changes in the Niche Following Tumor Cell Invasion. J Cell Biochem 118:1956-1964
Fuhrmann, Alexander; Banisadr, Afsheen; Beri, Pranjali et al. (2017) Metastatic State of Cancer Cells May Be Indicated by Adhesion Strength. Biophys J 112:736-745
Shiozawa, Yusuke; Berry, Janice E; Eber, Matthew R et al. (2016) The marrow niche controls the cancer stem cell phenotype of disseminated prostate cancer. Oncotarget 7:41217-41232
Amend, Sarah R; Valkenburg, Kenneth C; Pienta, Kenneth J (2016) Murine Hind Limb Long Bone Dissection and Bone Marrow Isolation. J Vis Exp :
Amend, Sarah R; Roy, Sounak; Brown, Joel S et al. (2016) Ecological paradigms to understand the dynamics of metastasis. Cancer Lett 380:237-42
Pan, Deng; Roy, Somdutta; Gascard, Philippe et al. (2016) SOX2, OCT3/4 and NANOG expression and cellular plasticity in rare human somatic cells requires CD73. Cell Signal 28:1923-1932
Gascard, Philippe; Tlsty, Thea D (2016) Carcinoma-associated fibroblasts: orchestrating the composition of malignancy. Genes Dev 30:1002-19
Jung, Younghun; Decker, Ann M; Wang, Jingcheng et al. (2016) Endogenous GAS6 and Mer receptor signaling regulate prostate cancer stem cells in bone marrow. Oncotarget 7:25698-711

Showing the most recent 10 out of 94 publications