The Administrative Core will play a crucial role in the operation and organization of the Center. The fundamental responsibility of the Administrative Core is to ensure that the overall impact of the Center is greater than the sum of the individual research, education/training, outreach, and developmental activities. This requires a top down commitment to the center concept. As a result, the most important function of the Administrative Core is to facilitate interactions, coordination, and integration across all activities and within the mission and theme of the Center.
The specific aims of the Administrative Core are:
Aim 1. To provide leadership and management planning for the successful interaction, coordination, and integration of the research, education/training, outreach, and developmental activities of the Center.
Aim 2. To manage the funds and resources of the Center to ensure completion of the research projects and core goals.
Aim 3. To ensure the timely, efficient, and appropriate dissemination of information about the Center and research advances to government agencies and officials, professional audiences, and the affected communities.
Aim 4. To coordinate communication with the NCI.
Aim 5. To facilitate the rapid transfer of new technologies to the clinic.
Aim 6. To manage external input and advice through effective use of the Center Advisory Board.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Specialized Center--Cooperative Agreements (U54)
Project #
5U54CA151838-04
Application #
8545553
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZCA1-GRB-S)
Project Start
2013-09-13
Project End
2015-07-31
Budget Start
2013-09-13
Budget End
2014-07-31
Support Year
4
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$115,618
Indirect Cost
$105,001
Name
Johns Hopkins University
Department
Type
DUNS #
001910777
City
Baltimore
State
MD
Country
United States
Zip Code
21218
Song, Xiaolei; Yang, Xing; Ray Banerjee, Sangeeta et al. (2015) Anthranilic acid analogs as diamagnetic CEST MRI contrast agents that feature an intramolecular-bond shifted hydrogen. Contrast Media Mol Imaging 10:74-80
Srivastava, Amit K; Bulte, Jeff W M (2014) Seeing stem cells at work in vivo. Stem Cell Rev 10:127-44
Nimmagadda, Sridhar; Pullambhatla, Mrudula; Lisok, Ala et al. (2014) Imaging Axl expression in pancreatic and prostate cancer xenografts. Biochem Biophys Res Commun 443:635-40
Li, Yang; Foss, Catherine A; Pomper, Martin G et al. (2014) Imaging denatured collagen strands in vivo and ex vivo via photo-triggered hybridization of caged collagen mimetic peptides. J Vis Exp :e51052
Bulte, Jeff W M; Schmieder, Anne H; Keupp, Jochen et al. (2014) MR cholangiography demonstrates unsuspected rapid biliary clearance of nanoparticles in rodents: implications for clinical translation. Nanomedicine 10:1385-8
Bhatnagar, Akrita; Wang, Yuchuan; Mease, Ronnie C et al. (2014) AEG-1 promoter-mediated imaging of prostate cancer. Cancer Res 74:5772-81
Das, Samarjit; Bedja, Djahida; Campbell, Nathaniel et al. (2014) miR-181c regulates the mitochondrial genome, bioenergetics, and propensity for heart failure in vivo. PLoS One 9:e96820
Williford, John-Michael; Wu, Juan; Ren, Yong et al. (2014) Recent advances in nanoparticle-mediated siRNA delivery. Annu Rev Biomed Eng 16:347-70
Shallal, Hassan M; Minn, Il; Banerjee, Sangeeta R et al. (2014) Heterobivalent agents targeting PSMA and integrin-?v?3. Bioconjug Chem 25:393-405
Yang, Xing; Yadav, Nirbhay N; Song, Xiaolei et al. (2014) Tuning phenols with Intra-Molecular bond Shifted HYdrogens (IM-SHY) as diaCEST MRI contrast agents. Chemistry 20:15824-32

Showing the most recent 10 out of 56 publications