Drawing on the broad scientific expertise of faculty at Washington University in St. Louis and collaborators and consultants from other institutions, we propose to build on existing transdisciplinary approaches and create a center to address mechanisms of obesity and cancer, """"""""from cell to society"""""""". We include projects that move beyond traditional risk factor-cancer associations to look at multilevel and multigenerational associations as well as the interaction of traditional cancer risk behaviors. We leverage the unique opportunity Missouri provides to study human populations given its diversity across race/ethnicity and socioeconomic status. We will delineate mechanisms by which preconception diet, nutrition &built environment polices impact inactivity and physical activity and energy balance to influence body weight and carcinogenesis across the life course. Specifically we aim to: 1. Investigate in a mouse model the effect of maternal high fat diet and changes in metabolic bioenergetics on prostate gland development and susceptibility to prostate cancer in male mouse offspring; 2. Study the role of physical activity and obesity in post-prostatectomy urinary and sexual function; 3. Develop models of obesity across the life course and generations incorporating biologic, clinical and social determinants of risk and mortality, which can be applied to different cancer outcomes, using non- Hodgkin Lymphoma as the initial platform; 4. Study policies relating to nutrition and built environment that impact energy balance and obesity; 5. Train postdoctoral fellows in a transdisciplinary environment to pursue careers in energetics and cancer and expose scholars from across our university to transdisciplinary work in obesity and cancer; 6. Foster scientific synergy via smaller-scale innovative transdisciplinary research that builds on the Center's theme and resources;and 7. Maximize efficiency and productivity of TREC-related studies and cores by building an outstanding transdisciplinary center supported by outstanding administrative, budgetary, and technology resources. To address these aims, we propose four research projects and five cores that form a cohesive, transdisciplinary center focused on research, training/career development, and dissemination.

Public Health Relevance

This Center will bring new approaches to understanding both genetic and social determinants and obesity across generations. Importantly the Center research addresses obesity and physical inactivity influence cancer outcomes, including among cancer survivors, and extends study of obesity and treatment outcomes to Non-Hodgkin Lymphoma, an increasingly common malignancy. Together these studies will inform policy and practice to prevent obesity and reduce the burden of cancer due to obesity.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Specialized Center--Cooperative Agreements (U54)
Project #
5U54CA155496-04
Application #
8688934
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZCA1)
Program Officer
Grant, Yvonne F
Project Start
2011-06-15
Project End
2016-05-31
Budget Start
2014-06-01
Budget End
2015-05-31
Support Year
4
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
Washington University
Department
Surgery
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
City
Saint Louis
State
MO
Country
United States
Zip Code
63130
Powell, Byron J; Beidas, Rinad S; Lewis, Cara C et al. (2017) Methods to Improve the Selection and Tailoring of Implementation Strategies. J Behav Health Serv Res 44:177-194
Chang, Su-Hsin; Yu, Yao-Chi; Carlsson, Nils P et al. (2017) Racial disparity in life expectancies and life years lost associated with multiple obesity-related chronic conditions. Obesity (Silver Spring) 25:950-957
Magkos, Faidon; Sullivan, Shelby; Fitch, Mark et al. (2017) Effect of Weight Gain and Weight Loss on In Vivo Colonocyte Proliferation Rate in People with Obesity. Obesity (Silver Spring) 25 Suppl 2:S81-S86
Yang, Lin; Toriola, Adetunji T (2017) Inflammation Modifies the Association of Obesity with Circulating 25-Hydroxyvitamin D Levels in Cancer Survivors. Obesity (Silver Spring) 25 Suppl 2:S58-S65
Hipp, J Aaron; Dodson, Elizabeth A; Lee, Jung Ae et al. (2017) Mixed methods analysis of eighteen worksite policies, programs, and environments for physical activity. Int J Behav Nutr Phys Act 14:79
Xiao, Daphne Y; Luo, Suhong; O'Brian, Katiuscia et al. (2017) Weight change trends and overall survival in United States veterans with follicular lymphoma treated with chemotherapy. Leuk Lymphoma 58:851-858
Leung, Man Yee Mallory; Carlsson, Nils P; Colditz, Graham A et al. (2017) The Burden of Obesity on Diabetes in the United States: Medical Expenditure Panel Survey, 2008 to 2012. Value Health 20:77-84
Chang, Su-Hsin; Liu, Xiaoyan; Carlsson, Nils P et al. (2017) Reexamining the Association of Body Mass Index With Overall Survival Outcomes After Liver Transplantation. Transplant Direct 3:e172
Rosner, Bernard; Eliassen, A Heather; Toriola, Adetunji T et al. (2017) Weight and weight changes in early adulthood and later breast cancer risk. Int J Cancer 140:2003-2014
Yang, Lin; Toriola, Adetunji T (2017) Leisure-time physical activity and circulating 25-hydroxyvitamin D levels in cancer survivors: a cross-sectional analysis using data from the US National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey. BMJ Open 7:e016064

Showing the most recent 10 out of 89 publications