The North Carolina Central University (NCCU) and the Lineberger Comprehensive Cancer Center (LCCC) at the University of North Carolina Chapel Hill (UNC-CH) propose to continue an effective, sustainable, and mutually beneficial partnership in Cancer Research that focuses on African-American health disparities. During the past eight years and with funding from the NCI, the two institutions have firmly established the Partnership by building on complementary instituflonal strengths, conducting joint planning in molecular cancer research, population-based research and training of junior faculty and students. The Partnership now proposes to expand these iniflaflves through an NCI-funded Cooperative Planning Grant (U54) for Comprehensive Partnerships to Reduce Cancer Health Disparities. Our objecflves are: (1) To expand research collaborations among the two institutions;(2) To use research activities in and outside the U54 mechanism to train students and junior/mid-level faculty in mulfldisciplinary research aimed at reducing cancer disparities;and (3) To expand and consolidate programs of community outreach and education. The strengths of each institution are uniquely posifloned to overcome the weaknesses found in the other to achieve these priorities. Specific collaborative components of the proposal include: 3 full projects in basic cancer research, one full and two pilot projects in community outreach, one minority training project, and one shared resource to enhance NCCU infrastructure and the partnership. The extensive expertise, and resources of LCCC in cancer research and cancer education training, the demonstrated interest in minority health disparities and the experience of NCCU in reaching minority populaflons, faculty and students, are complementary institutional strengths that will help the Partnership: 1) establish an effective cancer research infrastructure/program and increase training opportunities at a minority serving institution;and 2) enhance community- and populaflon-based research targeting minority cancer-related health disparities and increase training ef minority scienflsts at an NCI-funded Comprehensive Cancer Center.

Public Health Relevance

African-Americans suffer a disproportionate share ofthe cancer burden, with overall cancer mortality rate averaging one third higher than Caucasian Americans. Furthermore, for cancers such as prostate or cervical cancer where treatment can be effective, the rates of treatment failure or recurrence are higher in African Americans. This partnership will help address these health disparities by promoflng minority-targeted research, and by developing the research infrastructure, capacity, and effectiveness of NCUU.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Specialized Center--Cooperative Agreements (U54)
Project #
3U54CA156735-05S1
Application #
8871990
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZCA1-SRLB-3 (O1))
Program Officer
Moten, Carmen P
Project Start
2010-09-29
Project End
2015-08-31
Budget Start
2014-09-01
Budget End
2015-08-31
Support Year
5
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$78,658
Indirect Cost
$23,971
Name
North Carolina Central University
Department
Type
Organized Research Units
DUNS #
783691801
City
Durham
State
NC
Country
United States
Zip Code
27707
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