The University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences (UAMS) is undertaking a series of initiatives aimed at synergizing existing clinical and translational research programs, and revamping the institutional research endeavor. The Arkansas Center for Clinical and Translational Research (CCTR) has been formed which unites all UAMS Colleges and its Graduate School behind the translational research endeavor. Our overarching goal is to establish an integrative CCTR that transforms the pace, effectiveness, and quality of translational research at UAMS, resulting in better health for all Arkansans. The 4 overall goals are as follows:
Specific Aim 1 : Educate the next generation of physicians and scientists in collaborative translational science;
Specific Aim 2 : Develop partnerships with Arkansas's communities to assure that our research addresses their concerns and needs, and that they benefit from our findings;
Specific Aim 3 : Champion nnovation and collaboration in research and discovery to bring new technologies to Arkansans;
Specific Aim 4 : Provide administrative structure that facilitates translational research through promoting productive interactions among basic science, clinical, health services, and health policy researchers. These goals are supported by intensive component programs (Governance, Regulatory Support, Participant and Clinical Interaction Resources, Informatics, Design/Biostatistics, Ethics, Education, Novel methodologies/Pilot studies, Translational Technologies, Community Engagement) plus 3 additional program components in which we are particularly strong, and which will serve well the greater Arkansas community: These are Health Services Research, Behavioral Research, and Epidemiology. Arkansas has an outstanding telemedicine program to support our community-based research efforts. UAMS is developing a new Division of Informatics. Thus, the Arkansas CCTR will bring considerable added value to Arkansas, and represent a model program for research that extends nationally to rural communities. The CCTR will foster the formation of a cross-disciplinary, multi-faceted interface among the laboratory bench, patient bedside, and wider community through an interactive network of scientists. It will also facilitate training of future clinical and translational investigators across the health sciences and forge strategic collaborations among researchers, community clinicians, clinical research networks, professional societies, industry, and policy makers to facilitate the development of innovative research, increase the responsiveness and efficiency of translational research, and catalyze the application of new knowledge and techniques to clinical practice at the front lines of patient care.

Public Health Relevance

The Arkansas CCTR along with this CTSA interface will facilitate training of future clinical and translational investigators across the health sciences and forge strategic collaborations among researchers, community clinicians, clinical research networks, professional societies, industry, and policy makers to facilitate development of innovative research, increase the responsiveness and efficiency of translational research, and catalyze the application of new knowledge and techniques to clinical practice at the front lines of patient care.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS)
Type
Linked Specialized Center Cooperative Agreement (UL1)
Project #
3UL1TR000039-05S2
Application #
8917344
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRR1-CR-1 (01))
Program Officer
Purucker, Mary E
Project Start
2009-07-14
Project End
2015-03-31
Budget Start
2014-09-05
Budget End
2015-03-04
Support Year
5
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$107,877
Indirect Cost
$35,476
Name
University of Arkansas for Medical Sciences
Department
Obstetrics & Gynecology
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
122452563
City
Little Rock
State
AR
Country
United States
Zip Code
72205
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