The overall goal of the Mayo Clinic CTSA is to continue to build a broad-based and integrated home for clinical and translational science (CTS) at Mayo Clinic that will ultimately improve human health. In this context, we seek to make the Mayo CTSA and the resources it leverages both an engine of efficiency for clinical and translational research and at the same time a driver of innovation. We also seek to integrate our local activities with consortium wide efforts directed at coordination and alignment. To achieve our goal we have six overarching specific aims for this renewal:
Aim 1 - Train and maintain an outstanding multidisciplinary clinical and translational sciences workforce. This workforce includes teams of both investigators and support staff.
Aim 2 - Eliminate barriers to the work of translation. This will be accomplished through a) continued efforts at regulatory and compliance streamlining, b) provision of outstanding design, biostatistics, and ethics support for investigators, and c) further integration of support services.
Aim 3 - Collaborate with providers and communities to improve health care delivery and community health. This includes substantial commitments to practice-based research, community- engaged research and translating comparative effectiveness research into clinical practice.
Aim 4 - Deploy advanced facilities and other core resources to increase the value of clinical research. With value defined in this context as the quotient of quality and cost, the goal is to increase quality, decrease costs, and provide resources to the full spectrum of clinical and translational investigation.
Aim 5 - Stimulate novel research directions and methodologies by targeted support of innovative pilot and feasibility studies and fostering the development of novel methodologies.
Aim 6 - Employ informatics to integrate and facilitate clinical and translational investigation. This encompasses a broad view of informatics including: a) developing a standardized electronic data capture and analysis tools for CTS, b) robust consultation and tools for medical informatics that leverage Mayo's commitments to electronic clinical systems, and c) bioinformatics services and capabilities that will help facilitate the application of the """"""""new biology"""""""" to clinical and translational investigation. This vision is entirely consistent with the stated mission of Mayo Clinic: """"""""To provide the best care to every patient every day through integrated clinical practice, education, and research.""""""""

Public Health Relevance

Mayo Clinic Center for Translational Science Activities will bring together all the resources of the five schools within the Mayo Clinic College of Medicine and more than 100 years of scientific and medical research expertise, to discover innovative new methods that will speed the translation of research results into therapies, tools, and patient care practices that impact both our local and national communities by improving their health.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Center for Advancing Translational Sciences (NCATS)
Type
Linked Specialized Center Cooperative Agreement (UL1)
Project #
5UL1TR000135-08
Application #
8499944
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRR1-CR-1 (01))
Program Officer
Rosenblum, Daniel
Project Start
2006-09-30
Project End
2016-06-30
Budget Start
2013-07-01
Budget End
2014-06-30
Support Year
8
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$9,738,098
Indirect Cost
$1,577,615
Name
Mayo Clinic, Rochester
Department
Type
DUNS #
006471700
City
Rochester
State
MN
Country
United States
Zip Code
55905
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