The mission of the HIV Prevention Trials Network (HPTN) is to discover and develop interventions that can be used globally to prevent sexual and/or parenteral transmission of HIV. Our research encompasses the testing of novel biomedical and behavioral approaches. We seek HIV prevention strategies that are effective, safe, feasible, and sustainable, even in resource-limited settings. The incumbent HPTN has built field site research capacity in 16 developing countries. In the International HIVNET and the HPTN, we have recruited 31,250 HIV uninfected (principally) and infected persons into 38 trials (19,500 by the incumbent HPTN since 1999). Subjects are almost exclusively high risk, including adolescents and acutely infected persons. Focusing on resource-constrained countries in Africa, Asia, So. America, and E. Europe, as well as high incidence populations in the U.S., our highest impact trials have literally changed global public health practice, as with HIVNET 012 for the prevention of mother-to-infant HIV transmission. We are dividing the current HPTN agenda into three parts, our perinatal group partnering to create IMPAACT and the microbicide group spearheading MTN. Hence, the new HPTN focus is fourfold: (1) antiretroviral therapy and co-infection therapy for viral load reduction and prevention of HIV transmission;(2) treatment of sexually transmitted infections (STI) to lower HIV transmission risk;(3) treatment of substance abuse and addiction, including injection drug use and stimulants (cocaine and methamphetamines) to reduce HIV transmission; and (4) behavioral risk reduction with biological endpoints. We use randomized controlled trials with HIV incidence endpoints in uninfected persons. For prevention research among acutely and chronically HIV- infected persons, we study incidence of non-HIV STIs, lowering of HIV viral load, and/or HIV incidence in sexual or needle-sharing partners. We propose to complete five ongoing HPTN trials and to transition an additional six ongoing HPTN trials to IMPAACT and MTN networks, if funded. We present eight new trial concepts, five for prevention of HIV infection, one for detection and intervention among acutely infected persons (pre-seroconversion), and two focused on prevention among HIV-seropositive persons. Our risk populations include high risk heterosexuals, men who have sex with men, substance abusers, and, for selected trials, their sexual or needle-sharing partners. Our proposed affiliated Clinical Trials Units serve at- risk populations on five continents, especially sub-Saharan Africa and the U.S. The HPTN Leadership Group is experienced and diverse and includes experienced ethics experts and community leaders. HPTN governance is designed to develop and complete trials efficiently. We emphasize concepts of high potential public health impact, focusing on existing technologies that can be brought immediately into practice. Therefore, our agenda is complementary to long-term investments (finding a cure, vaccine, or microbicide).

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Type
Research Project with Complex Structure Cooperative Agreement (UM1)
Project #
3UM1AI068613-07S1
Application #
8627257
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAI1-TH-A (J2))
Program Officer
Gilbreath, Michael J
Project Start
2006-06-01
Project End
2013-12-31
Budget Start
2013-06-01
Budget End
2013-12-31
Support Year
7
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$1,777,536
Indirect Cost
$366,793
Name
Johns Hopkins University
Department
Pediatrics
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
001910777
City
Baltimore
State
MD
Country
United States
Zip Code
21218
Wada, Nikolas I; Bream, Jay H; Martínez-Maza, Otoniel et al. (2016) Inflammatory Biomarkers and Mortality Risk Among HIV-Suppressed Men: A Multisite Prospective Cohort Study. Clin Infect Dis 63:984-90
Dize, Laura; Barnes Jr, Perry; Barnes, Mathilda et al. (2016) Performance of self-collected penile-meatal swabs compared to clinician-collected urethral swabs for the detection of Chlamydia trachomatis, Neisseria gonorrhoeae, Trichomonas vaginalis, and Mycoplasma genitalium by nucleic acid amplification assays. Diagn Microbiol Infect Dis 86:131-5
Ranganathan, Meghna; Heise, Lori; Pettifor, Audrey et al. (2016) Transactional sex among young women in rural South Africa: prevalence, mediators and association with HIV infection. J Int AIDS Soc 19:20749
Golin, Carol E; Haley, Danielle F; Wang, Jing et al. (2016) Post-traumatic Stress Disorder Symptoms and Mental Health over Time among Low-Income Women at Increased Risk of HIV in the U.S. J Health Care Poor Underserved 27:891-910
Gaydos, Charlotte A; Jett-Goheen, Mary; Barnes, Mathilda et al. (2016) Self-testing for Trichomonas vaginalis at home using a point-of-care test by women who request kits via the Internet. Sex Health :
McKay, Heather S; Bream, Jay H; Margolick, Joseph B et al. (2016) Host factors associated with serologic inflammatory markers assessed using multiplex assays. Cytokine 85:71-9
Cohen, Myron S; Chen, Ying Q; McCauley, Marybeth et al. (2016) Antiretroviral Therapy for the Prevention of HIV-1 Transmission. N Engl J Med 375:830-9
Fogel, Jessica M; Clarke, William; Kulich, Michal et al. (2016) Antiretroviral drug use in a cross-sectional population survey in Africa: NIMH Project Accept (HPTN 043). J Acquir Immune Defic Syndr :
Hendrix, Craig W; Andrade, Adriana; Bumpus, Namandjé N et al. (2016) Dose Frequency Ranging Pharmacokinetic Study of Tenofovir-Emtricitabine After Directly Observed Dosing in Healthy Volunteers to Establish Adherence Benchmarks (HPTN 066). AIDS Res Hum Retroviruses 32:32-43
Landovitz, Raphael J; Kofron, Ryan; McCauley, Marybeth (2016) The promise and pitfalls of long-acting injectable agents for HIV prevention. Curr Opin HIV AIDS 11:122-8

Showing the most recent 10 out of 147 publications