Stanford University doctoral student Jenna Rice, with direction from Dr. Sylvia J. Yanagisako, will undertake research on the relationship between globalization and local practices of charitable giving. Over the past three decades, there has been a significant worldwide growth of philanthropic foundations, which are shaped by global economic and political processes. But at the local level, giving is also affected by particulars of social structure, community identity, and understandings of civic responsibility. This research will examine the interface between the locally germane prescriptive pressure people may feel to give for religious and political reasons, and international discourses of charity, philanthropy, and international finance.

The research will be carried out in Sidon, Lebanon. Lebanon is an appropriate site for this research because sectarian charitable foundations have become increasingly responsible for the provisioning of basic social services. This expansion of politically and religiously motivated sectarian charities will be compared to long-standard neighborhood practices of giving. Research methods will include archival research; intensive observation of a sample of households, stratified by members' age and generation; semi-structured interviews; and media and discourse analysis of the representation and treatment of poverty and charity in popular media.

This research is important because it contributes to social science theory of the relationship between international political and economic forces and local sectarian processes of resource pooling and reallocation through charitable giving. Funding this research also supports the education of a social scientist.

Project Report

Stanford University doctoral student Jenna Rice, with direction from Dr. Sylvia J. Yanagisako, undertook research on changing practices of charitable giving in southern Lebanon. Over the past three decades, there has been a significant worldwide growth of philanthropic foundations, which are shaped by global economic and political processes. But at the local level, giving is also affected by particulars of social structure, community identity, and understandings of civic responsibility. This research examined the interface between the prescriptive pressure people may feel to give for religious and political reasons, and international discourses of charity, philanthropy, and international finance. The research was carried out in Saida, Lebanon. Lebanon was a particularly compelling site for this research because there are very few state-provided forms of social welfare, which places the bulk of responsibility on NGOs and other small-scale endeavors. Research focused on the rise of family charitable groups since the end of Lebanon’s civil war (1990), which exclusively provide support for kin. Research methods included semi-structured interviews with leaders of NGOs and family associations; intensive observation of charitable giving, especially during the month of Ramadan; media and discourse analysis of the representation and treatment of poverty and charity in popular media; and archival research. This research is important because it contributes to social science theory of the relationship between international political and economic forces and local processes of resource pooling and reallocation through charitable giving. This research also supported the education of a social scientist.

Agency
National Science Foundation (NSF)
Institute
Division of Behavioral and Cognitive Sciences (BCS)
Type
Standard Grant (Standard)
Application #
1121309
Program Officer
Jeffrey Mantz
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2012-01-15
Budget End
2013-06-30
Support Year
Fiscal Year
2011
Total Cost
$17,250
Indirect Cost
Name
Stanford University
Department
Type
DUNS #
City
Palo Alto
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
94304