This travel grant provides support for leading scientists, early-career faculty, and graduate students to participate discussions on thermal energy transfer for energy harvesting, at the Materials Research Society (MRS) annual spring meeting, San Francisco, CA in April 25-29, 2011. The symposium will bring researchers together from two communities, materials and thermal energy. The current needs in energy and waste heat recovery have challenged mechanical engineers and materials scientists in design of engineering components and fabrication of novel materials for heat transfer and energy harvesting. This symposium provides an opportunity for participants to discuss important issues in thermal energy transfer and materials development.

The intellectual merit of this grant will provide a venue for examination of energy transfer, waster energy recovery, and needs for materials development.

The broad impacts of the grant are in enabling the participation of students and early career scientists in the symposium, thereby providing the education and training opportunities for next generation scientists.

Project Report

Report on MRS Symposium E, Energy Harvesting, from Fundamentals to Devices PI: Hong Liang, Texas A&M University Co-PI: Harry Radousky, Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory This travel grant supported leading scientists, early-career faculty, and graduate students to participate discussions on thermal energy transfer for energy harvesting, at the Materials Research Society (MRS) annual spring meeting, San Francisco, CA in April 25-29, 2011. The symposium brought researchers together from two communities, materials and thermal energy. The current needs in energy and waste heat recovery have challenged mechanical engineers and materials scientists in design of engineering components and fabrication of novel materials for heat transfer and energy harvesting. This symposium provided an opportunity for participants to discuss important issues in thermal energy transfer and materials development, fundamental and practical. The intellectual merit of this grant was to provide a venue for examination of energy transfer, waster energy recovery, and needs for materials development. The broad impacts of the grant are in enabling the participation of students and early career scientists in the symposium, thereby providing the education and training opportunities for next generation scientists. At the end, one book of proceedings of the symposium was published. In addition, an invited review paper on nanomaterials and devices for energy harvesting was generated and currently in review. These publication materials will be used as guides for future development in energy.

Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2011-02-01
Budget End
2012-01-31
Support Year
Fiscal Year
2011
Total Cost
$5,000
Indirect Cost
Name
Texas Engineering Experiment Station
Department
Type
DUNS #
City
College Station
State
TX
Country
United States
Zip Code
77845