WDM (wave-length multiplexing) Optical networks form the critical backbone of all modern communication networks and systems. Therefore, there has been a great deal of interest in the fault tolerant design and operation of these networks. In the past decade or so several fundamental advances relating to the fault tolerance, protection and restoration issues have appeared in the literature. Most of these advances have been in the context of failures in one layer. But, modern communication systems consist of multiple physical implementations communicating via layered protocols. As such, a single failure at one layer may lead to cascading failures, i.e., failures at the physical layer lead to failures at the logical layer. Research in this area of cross-layer survivability is still in its infancy. In this basic research project the principal investigators will carry out a study of network survivability across layers to deal with cascading failures in layered networks. The research will be in the context of IP-over-WDM Optical networks. The focus will be on multiple failures in the physical (optical) layer and their consequences at the higher layer, namely the IP layer. Specifically, the broad scope of the project will cover i) survivable logical topology mapping under multiple failures, ii) Logical topology mapping for guaranteed survivability, iii) Logical topology mapping under multiple constraints, and iv) A generalized theory of flows across layers, capacity of survivable logical topologies and related algorithmic challenges.

The project seeks to develop unifying theories and methodologies that will make significant advances to our understanding of cross-layer survivability issues, and providing the theoretical foundation for future advances in the general area of cross-layer design and optimization. These theories will be based on modern advances in graph theory, mathematical programming (e.g., network interdiction) and algorithm design. The principal investigators will develop innovative algorithmic techniques based on advanced data structures and computer algorithms such as approximation techniques as well as a generalized theory of cross layer flows that will go well beyond the widely used classical theory of single layer flows.

Broader Impact: Although IP-Over-WDM networks will provide the context for the research, the theory of cross-layer flows and the algorithmic (in particular approximation) techniques that will be developed will have multidisciplinary value spanning computer science, electrical engineering, graph theory and mathematical programming. The research will also have significant educational value in training highly skilled researchers for research and development in cutting edge technologies in different areas of information technology.

Project Report

Project Description: WDM (wave-length multiplexing) Optical networks form the critical backbone of all modern communication networks and systems. Therefore, there has been a great deal of interest in the fault tolerant design and operation of these networks. In the past decade or so several fundamental advances relating to the fault tolerance, protection and restoration issues have appeared in the literature. Most of these advances have been in the context of failures in one layer. But, modern communication systems consist of multiple physical implementations communicating via layered protocols. As such, a single failure at one layer may lead to cascading failures, i.e., failures at the physical layer lead to failures at the logical layer. Research in this area of cross-layer survivability is still in its infancy. In this basic research project the principal investigators will carry out a study of network survivability across layers to deal with cascading failures in layered networks. The research will be in the context of IP-over-WDM Optical networks. The focus will be on multiple failures in the physical (optical) layer and their consequences at the higher layer, namely the IP layer. Specifically, the broad scope of the project will cover i) survivable logical topology mapping under multiple failures, ii) Logical topology mapping for guaranteed survivability, iii) Logical topology mapping under multiple constraints, and iv) A generalized theory of flows across layers, capacity of survivable logical topologies and related algorithmic challenges. The project seeks to develop unifying theories and methodologies that will make significant advances to our understanding of cross-layer survivability issues, and providing the theoretical foundation for future advances in the general area of cross-layer design and optimization. These theories will be based on modern advances in graph theory, mathematical programming (e.g., network interdiction) and algorithm design. The principal investigators will develop innovative algorithmic techniques based on advanced data structures and computer algorithms such as approximation techniques as well as a generalized theory of cross layer flows that will go well beyond the widely used classical theory of single layer flows. Broader Impact: Although IP-Over-WDM networks will provide the context for the research, the theory of cross-layer flows and the algorithmic (in particular approximation) techniques that will be developed will have multidisciplinary value spanning computer science, electrical engineering, graph theory and mathematical programming. The research will also have significant educational value in training highly skilled researchers for research and development in cutting edge technologies in different areas of information technology. Publications: [1] Guoliang Xue ,Ravi Gottapu, Xi Fang, Dejun Yang, and Krishnaiyan Thulasiraman; "A Linear Time Algorithm for Computing Disjoint Lightpath Pairs in Minimum Isolated Failure Immune WDM Optical Networks"; IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking; Vol 22 (2014), pp. 470-483. [2] Dejun Yang, Guoliang Xue, Xi Fang, Satyajayant Misra and Jin Zhang; "A Game Theoretic Approach to Stable Routing in Max-Min Fair Networks"; IEEE/ACM Transactions on Networking (TON); Vol. 21(2013), pp. 1947-1959. [3] Xi Fang, Dejun Yang, and Guoliang Xue; "MAP: Multi-Constrained Anypath Routing in Wireless Mesh Networks"; IEEE Transactions on Mobile Computing (TMC); Vol. 12 (2013), pp. 1893-1906. [4] Dejun Yang, Jin Zhang, Xi Fang, Andrea Richa and Guoliang Xue; "Coping with a Smart Jammer in Wireless Networks: A Stackelberg Game Approach"; IEEE Transactions on Wireless Communications (TWC); Vol. 12 2013), pp. 4038-4047. [5] Xi Fang, Dejun Yang, Guoliang Xue; "Taming Wheel of Fortune in the Air: An Algorithmic Framework for Channel Selection Strategy in Cognitive Radio Networks"; IEEE Transactions on Vehicular Technology; Vol. 62(2013); pp. 783-796. [6] Dejun Yang, Xiang Zhang, Guoliang Xue; "PROMISE: A Framework for Truthful and Profit Maximizing Spectrum Double Auctions"; IEEE INFOCOM’2014, pp. 109-117. [7] Tachun Lin, Zhili Zhou, Krishnaiyan Thulasiraman, Guoliang Xue, Sartaj Sahni, "Unified Mathematical Programming Frameworks for Survivable Logical Topology Routing in IP-over-WDM Optical Networks," IEEE/OSA Journal of Optical Communications and Networking (JOCN), Vol. 6 (2014 ), pp. 190-203. [8] Tachun Lin, Zhili Zhou, Krishnaiyan Thulasiraman, Guoliang Xue, "Optimum Logical Topology Routing in an IP-over-WDM Optical Network and Physical Link Failure Localization: An Integrated Approach," 5th International Workshop on Reliable Networks Design and Modeling (RNDM), Sep. 10-12, 2013.

Agency
National Science Foundation (NSF)
Institute
Division of Computer and Network Systems (CNS)
Type
Standard Grant (Standard)
Application #
1115129
Program Officer
Joseph Lyles
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2011-08-01
Budget End
2014-07-31
Support Year
Fiscal Year
2011
Total Cost
$150,000
Indirect Cost
Name
Arizona State University
Department
Type
DUNS #
City
Tempe
State
AZ
Country
United States
Zip Code
85281