This award provides travel support to enable graduate student participation in a conference held at Carnegie Mellon University on March 8-9, 2011, on the subject of "Emerging Behavior in the Changing Electric Energy Industry."

As new and unconventional technologies become connected to the electric power grid, and the system is driven by qualitatively new economic and environmental objectives, new phenomena will emerge. Some of these may lower cost and improve reliability, but some will challenge the stability and reliability of the electricity system. For example, if a large proportion of residential and commercial customers have solar panels that feed electricity into the grid when the sun is shining, but abruptly require power when a cloud passes over the sun, the dynamic stresses on the grid will increase, perhaps to unmanageable levels. A system based on minimizing costs with current rules for preserving stability and reliability could lead to unacceptable service. Before making these changes in technology and management practices, it would be prudent to understand the challenges that the current system faces, the reasons for its relatively good record of reliability, and how the system will be challenged by the changes.

The focus of the meeting is on unintended consequences of changes in the electricity system. Topics include causes, modeling, and dynamics of hard-to-predict emerging technical and economic phenomena. The meeting focuses on issues affecting the smart grid, dynamic pricing, and decentralized generation (including net metering for an area with a high penetration of solar self-generation). The objective is to identify fundamental approaches for transforming today's operating and planning industry practices, and to identify supporting policies that can manage short-and long-term uncertainty and ensure sustainable electricity services.

Project Report

". All conference slide presentations can be found in www.ece.cmu.edu/~electricityconference/2011/index.html. The conference purpose is described below: EMERGING PHENOMENA IN CHANGING ELECTRIC ENERGY SYSTEMS: What Might Happen, Why, and How to Manage It? ORGANIZERS: Prof. Marija Ilic (CMU-ECE) Prof. Lester Lave (CMU-TSB) CO-ORGANIZERS: Prof. Simon Haykin (McMaster University) Dr. Eugene Litvinov (ISO-NE) This conference focuses on the unintended consequences of changes in the electricity system. Papers are solicited concerning causes, modeling and dynamics of hard-to-predict emerging phenomenon. Of particular interest are papers that relate unintended consequences to investments in smart grid, dynamic pricing, decentralized generation (including net metering for an area with a high penetration of solar self generation). Papers are also solicited on fundamental approaches to transforming today's operating and planning industry practices, and the supporting policies, to manage such short-and long-term uncertain problems to ensure sustainable electricity services. Motivation for the theme: As unconventional technologies (many of them new) get connected to the electric power grid, and the system is driven by qualitatively new economic and environmental objectives, new phenomena will emerge. Some of these may lower cost and improve reliability, but some will challenge the stability and reliability of the electricity system. For example, if a large proportion of residential and commercial customers have solar panels that feed electricity into the grid when the sun is shining, but abruptly require power when a cloud passes over the sun, the dynamic stresses on the grid will increase, perhaps to unmanageable levels. A system based on minimizing costs with current rules for preserving stability and reliability could lead to unacceptable service. Before making these changes in technology and management practices, it would be prudent to understand the challenges that the current system faces, the reasons for its relatively good record of reliability, and how the system will be challenged by the changes. History of the Conference The Carnegie Mellon Conference on the Electricity Industry is now in its seventh year of offering networking on timely topics, co-sponsored by A123 Systems, ABB, Bosch, the Carnegie Mellon Electricity Industry Center (CEIC), the Carnegie Mellon Dept of ECE, Nexans, NSF, SRC-ERI, and the Tepper School of Business.

Agency
National Science Foundation (NSF)
Institute
Division of Computer and Network Systems (CNS)
Type
Standard Grant (Standard)
Application #
1132763
Program Officer
D. Helen Gill
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2011-06-15
Budget End
2012-05-31
Support Year
Fiscal Year
2011
Total Cost
$3,000
Indirect Cost
Name
Carnegie-Mellon University
Department
Type
DUNS #
City
Pittsburgh
State
PA
Country
United States
Zip Code
15213