This proposed project is to investigate how and why STEM innovations are implemented and sustained in schools. The PIs seek to identify factors at the district, school, and classroom levels that contribute to or inhibit implementation and sustainability of Everyday Mathematics (EM). It is designed to answer several important research questions, such as, (1) What factors contribute to and/or inhibit the implementation of EM in the study sites? (2) Do the factors that affect implementation and sustainability change with maturity of implementation and if so, how? (3) What are the relationships between the status of EM implementation, maturity of implementation, factors that affect implementation, and student demographics and achievement?

This project will use sophisticated quantitative methodologies and a Fidelity of Implementation instrument to answer the research questions. While it focuses on EM, it is likely to generate much-needed insights about the specific mechanisms and processes that underlie the adoption and use of any standards-based instructional materials.

Educational innovations are a constant fixture in school districts across the country. One of the most important goals for any educational innovation is to improve student learning. However, too often these innovations fail to improve student learning because they are not implemented with fidelity or are not sustainable. This project will contribute to emerging foundational understandings about how to enact and support lasting innovations.

Agency
National Science Foundation (NSF)
Institute
Division of Research on Learning in Formal and Informal Settings (DRL)
Application #
1109595
Program Officer
Finbarr Sloane
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2011-09-01
Budget End
2014-08-31
Support Year
Fiscal Year
2011
Total Cost
$886,117
Indirect Cost
Name
University of Chicago
Department
Type
DUNS #
City
Chicago
State
IL
Country
United States
Zip Code
60637