Intellectual Merit: This project will address the two important aspects of NW FETs - device designs and characterization techniques, with a goal to demonstrate the operation of SiNW FETs in the 1 ? 4 GHz range. Nanowire based HF transistors operating in this range could have transformative impacts in the fields of flexible/wearable/implantable electronics, medical diagnostics/imaging, remote sensing, micro-RFID, etc. The adopted research methodology is general enough to be relevant for different nanowire material systems. This study for the first time would address the fundamental question ? can we get high-speed devices using SiNWs grown by bottom-up methods? Similarly, this study will investigate the effect of various novel NW device designs on their HF performances.

Broader Impact: Successful completion of this project will advance our understanding of the fundamental high-frequency operating limits of SiNW transistors. The nature of the proposed research is such that the knowledge gained from it can be readily incorporated into graduate level curriculum. The PIs have planned to introduce two small course modules: 1) Fabrication of Nanowire Transistors for the course ENEE 719A -Advanced Topics in Microelectronics: Nanostructure Fabrication Technology and 2) Device Physics of Nanowire Transistors for the course ENEE 601 -Semiconductor Devices & Technology. These two modules will expose the students to the latest research results in nanoscale semiconductor devices while broadly disseminating the knowledge gained from the research.

Agency
National Science Foundation (NSF)
Institute
Division of Electrical, Communications and Cyber Systems (ECCS)
Application #
1128021
Program Officer
John M. Zavada
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2011-08-15
Budget End
2014-07-31
Support Year
Fiscal Year
2011
Total Cost
$330,000
Indirect Cost
Name
University of Maryland College Park
Department
Type
DUNS #
City
College Park
State
MD
Country
United States
Zip Code
20742