Among the hazards that arise from large earthquakes are the direct effects of great earthquakes, as evidenced by last year?s devastating earthquake off Japan, and local and distant effects of tsunamis. Though they pose enormous risks to life and property in highly populated areas, neither of these phenomena is as yet well understood. The recent great earthquake in Chile did not generate a large tsunami, probably because the rupture produce a surface break at the seafloor. Available evidence suggests that slip did not occur at depths shallower than about 30 km down-dip from the trench. Accordingly, the proponents of this project infer that the outer accretionary wedge that lies along the Chile coast above the rupture zone behaves as a poro-elastic medium that will adjust over time to the new stress regime caused by the earthquake. The aim of the proposal is to observe the effects of this transient adjustment, by deploying a focused array of ocean bottom seismographs equipped with flow meters. The principal broader impact of this effort is considerably improved understanding of megathrust earthquakes and tsunamis.

Agency
National Science Foundation (NSF)
Institute
Division of Ocean Sciences (OCE)
Type
Standard Grant (Standard)
Application #
1129574
Program Officer
Bilal U. Haq
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2011-11-15
Budget End
2014-10-31
Support Year
Fiscal Year
2011
Total Cost
$249,874
Indirect Cost
Name
University of California-San Diego Scripps Inst of Oceanography
Department
Type
DUNS #
City
La Jolla
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
92093