The Projects of this Program have research strategies that variously involve genome-wide analysis of cancer cell epigenomes and transcriptomes and the use of screens involving genome editing. The primary objective of the Functional Epigenetics Core is to support the PO1 Projects with expertise in epigenetics approaches and CRISPR screens.
The specific aims of the Functional Epigenetics Core achieve this by providing the Program with the experimental and computational capabilities required to meet these essential programmatic needs. The Core is directed by Dr. Henry W. Long, an experienced, highly productive laboratory scientist based at the Center for Functional Cancer Epigenetics at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute in Boston. Dr. Long has a history of innovation in providing the critical resources and services to research projects in prostate and other cancers over the past 5 years at the CFCE. The Core is co-led by Dr. X Shirley Liu, a highly cited and productive computational biologist and biostatistician also based at the Dana Farber Cancer Institute. Dr. Liu has a very strong track record of innovation in epigenetics and CRISPR screening.
The Aims are 1) Support CRISPR screening approaches; 2) Provide capabilities and resources for performing complex epigenetic experiments; 3) Analysis and integration of epigenetic datasets; 4) Data sharing and management.

Public Health Relevance

The primary objective of the Functional Epigenetics Core is to support the PO1 Projects with expertise in epigenetics approaches and CRISPR screens. The specific aims of the Functional Epigenetics Core achieve this by providing the Program with the experimental and computational capabilities required to meet these essential programmatic needs. The Core is directed by Dr. Henry W. Long, a highly productive laboratory scientist, and by Dr. X Shirley Liu, a renowned computational biologist and biostatistician with a track record of innovation in epigenetics and CRISPR screening.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
5P01CA163227-07
Application #
9870896
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZCA1)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2020-02-01
Budget End
2021-01-31
Support Year
7
Fiscal Year
2020
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center
Department
Type
DUNS #
071723621
City
Boston
State
MA
Country
United States
Zip Code
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