The aim of this core is to provide pathology services by experienced pathologists with a unique combination of extensive background in the pathology of lymphomas and breast tumors. All four projects will benefit from the Core. Having all pathology studies conducted by a specialized entity ran by expert pathologists will ensure that the same standards will be apply across the different projects. This will be critically Important for cell studies in vitro, which will benefit from uniform experimental protocols and interpretation. Project 3 and 4 will perform tumor studies in mice that require a dedicated Core. Indeed, the pathology services and facilities currently in place at Columbia University are not certified for mouse pathology and could not handle the samples in a timely manner. The Core will be ran by two experts pathologists;Drs. Bhagat and Szabolcs, lymphoma and breast cancer experts, respectively. Both have extensive experience in murine and human pathology and have been associated with several of the project leaders for years in collaborative and productive studies. Therefore, quality control is completely in place, as all procedures have been optimized, standardized and streamlined. Thus, we anticipate the most efficient usage of this core.

Public Health Relevance

Core C will conduct immunofluorescence studies in cells and the histopatholgical analysis of animals and tumors for all four projects of this program. Core C will be critical to the studies proposed in this program especially for animal studies in Projects 3 and 4.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
1P01CA174653-01A1
Application #
8608851
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel ()
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-09-01
Budget End
2014-08-31
Support Year
1
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$188,901
Indirect Cost
$70,838
Name
Columbia University
Department
Type
DUNS #
621889815
City
New York
State
NY
Country
United States
Zip Code
10032
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