The primary objective of the Administrative Core is to ensure the effective integration and interaction of the scientists and other personnel working on the Projects and Scientific Cores that comprise this PPG. First, the Core establishes the scientific priorities and directions of the research through regular meetings of the PPG's Executive Committee. Second, the Core is responsible for administering the day-to-day activities of the PPG, including the monitoring of all budgets, submission of progress reports, and adherence to regulatory requirements associated with our research. Third, the Core coordinates the many modes of communication among PPG investigators, including regular Webex meetings, videoconferences, and face-to-face visits that ensure our integrated research program. Likewise, the Core supports visits to New York and other sites by members of our External Advisory Committee, and key consultants, to meet with PPG faculty and trainees and review the progress of our research. Fourth, the Core maintains a creative PPG website to foster communication not only among PPG investigators, but also with the scientific community and general public at large. Such communication includes resource and data sharing and the dissemination of vast amounts of genome-wide chromatin and gene expression data as rapidly as possible as well as enabling the free download of novel PPG software designed to analyze complex datasets. Fifth, the Core fosters several additional outreach efforts to patient advocacy and community organizations. Sixth, the Core, through the Executive Committee, works to ensure the successful career paths of numerous junior faculty as well as students and postdoctoral trainees. We expect numerous individual R and K grants and NRSAs to continue to be generated by the PPG's research. Such career development focuses in particular on the recruitment and retention of women and minority scientists;we are proud of our track record in this regard. Seventh, the Core is responsible, in collaboration with our various training programs, to ensure the safe and ethical conduct of research. Joining together effectively to form a unified research team is key to the success of this large undertaking, and we are confident in our continued ability to accomplish this goal.

Public Health Relevance

Addiction remains one of the world's greatest public health problems, yet its pathophysiology remains incompletely understood and available treatments for addictions to various drugs of abuse are inadequately effective for most people. We believe that the most effective way of eventually developing definitive treatments and cures for addiction rests in part in a better understanding of its underlying neurobiology.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
2P01DA008227-22A1
Application #
8609278
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRG1-IFCN-B (40))
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-01-01
Budget End
2014-12-31
Support Year
22
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$68,649
Indirect Cost
$28,148
Name
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
Department
Type
DUNS #
078861598
City
New York
State
NY
Country
United States
Zip Code
10029
Li, Xuan; Carreria, Maria B; Witonsky, Kailyn R et al. (2018) Role of Dorsal Striatum Histone Deacetylase 5 in Incubation of Methamphetamine Craving. Biol Psychiatry 84:213-222
Anderson, Ethan M; Larson, Erin B; Guzman, Daniel et al. (2018) Overexpression of the Histone Dimethyltransferase G9a in Nucleus Accumbens Shell Increases Cocaine Self-Administration, Stress-Induced Reinstatement, and Anxiety. J Neurosci 38:803-813
Walker, Deena M; Cates, Hannah M; Loh, Yong-Hwee E et al. (2018) Cocaine Self-administration Alters Transcriptome-wide Responses in the Brain's Reward Circuitry. Biol Psychiatry 84:867-880
Cahill, Michael E; Browne, Caleb J; Wang, Junshi et al. (2018) Withdrawal from repeated morphine administration augments expression of the RhoA network in the nucleus accumbens to control synaptic structure. J Neurochem 147:84-98
Cates, Hannah M; Li, Xuan; Purushothaman, Immanuel et al. (2018) Genome-wide transcriptional profiling of central amygdala and orbitofrontal cortex during incubation of methamphetamine craving. Neuropsychopharmacology 43:2426-2434
Gaspari, Sevasti; Purushothaman, Immanuel; Cogliani, Valeria et al. (2018) Suppression of RGSz1 function optimizes the actions of opioid analgesics by mechanisms that involve the Wnt/?-catenin pathway. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 115:E2085-E2094
Miller, M L; Ren, Y; Szutorisz, H et al. (2018) Ventral striatal regulation of CREM mediates impulsive action and drug addiction vulnerability. Mol Psychiatry 23:1328-1335
Monteggia, Lisa M; Heimer, Hakon; Nestler, Eric J (2018) Meeting Report: Can We Make Animal Models of Human Mental Illness? Biol Psychiatry 84:542-545
Clark, Christopher R; Maile, Makayla; Blaney, Patrick et al. (2018) Transposon mutagenesis screen in mice identifies TM9SF2 as a novel colorectal cancer oncogene. Sci Rep 8:15327
Cates, Hannah M; Heller, Elizabeth A; Lardner, Casey K et al. (2018) Transcription Factor E2F3a in Nucleus Accumbens Affects Cocaine Action via Transcription and Alternative Splicing. Biol Psychiatry 84:167-179

Showing the most recent 10 out of 312 publications