The Developmental Therapeutics Program comprises a highly collaborative effort in early phase drug development that serves as a magnet for bringing promising new anti-cancer drugs from the NCI, DF/HCC investigators and industry through the earliest phase of clinical evaluation. The Program is thus tightly integrated with Disease Programs and actively transitions drugs from early to later phase development. In addition, the Program is closely aligned with other Programs and Centers that focus on drug discovery and biomarker development, as well as aspects of cancer biology that include signal transduction, cell cycle regulation, DNA repair and immuno-oncology.
Three Specific Aims are planned over the next 5 years: (1) To conduct Phase I and I-II clinical trials of new anti-cancer agents and combinations with safety, pharmacokinetic, pharmacodynamic and preliminary efficacy endpoints; (2) To validate biomarkers for drug response, resistance, and toxicity; and (3) To provide mentoring and career development support for fellows and junior faculty in early drug development. The program has 58 members, representing six DF/HCC institutions and 11 academic departments. In 2014 peer-reviewed grant funding attributed to the Program was $3.7 million in total costs from the NCI and $0.3 million from other sponsors. During the current funding period, Developmental Therapeutics Program members published 1,364 cancer-relevant papers. Of these 28% were inter-institutional, 13% were intra-programmatic, and 59% were inter-programmatic collaborations between two or more DF/HCC members. Overall, when counted once, 27% of DF/HCC publications were inter- programmatic collaborations.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30CA006516-55
Application #
9842702
Study Section
Subcommittee I - Transistion to Independence (NCI)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2019-12-01
Budget End
2020-11-30
Support Year
55
Fiscal Year
2020
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
Dana-Farber Cancer Institute
Department
Type
DUNS #
076580745
City
Boston
State
MA
Country
United States
Zip Code
02215
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