Animal Models Core Facility We are combining two previous cores dealing with mouse cancer nnodels into a single Animal IVIodeis Core that functions to help LCCC members with all aspects of mouse-related research. Core staff assists with animal handling, xenograft tumor models, colony management, therapeutic trials, imaging studies, allele phenotyping and the design and production of genetically engineered mice (GEM). This core adds value to the Cancer Center by enabling cost-efficient murine testing even by members who do not have significant infrastructure and expertise for animal work. The core is co-directed by Chariene Ross and Dale Cowley, with faculty co-advisors Norman Sharpless and Bernard Weissman. Dr. Sharpless and Dr. Cowley have been added to the leadership since the last cycle to add expertise in GEM models and expand core capabilities. Experimental help spans the spectrum from transgenic / knockout allele production and design to allele phenotyping, animal imaging and therapeutic testing of novel anti-cancer agents in xenograft and genetically engineered tumor models. The core has 39 users (97% use by peer reviewed members for Animal Studies). Significant growth has occurred in the animal studies component of the core during the last year with core staff operating beyond overall capacity since August 2009. We request an increased budget of $283,591 that will represent 15% of the total Animal Models Core budget to promote expanded use. The Animal Models Core will grow significantly during the next cycle, driven largely by increased NIH funding to UNC investigators, the 50% increase in campus animal space and a strategic plan featuring cancer genetics and preclinical therapeutics testing. The Genetic Medicine building has recently opened with space for over 40,000 additional cages. The Imaging Research Building will open in 2013 with 2,000 additional cages for longitudinal mouse therapy and Imaging protocols. The Animal Models Core is well positioned to become the nexus for Cancer Center members exploiting the power of GEMs and xenograft tumor models for basic and translational cancer research.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
2P30CA016086-35
Application #
8340285
Study Section
Subcommittee G - Education (NCI)
Project Start
2011-05-23
Project End
2015-11-30
Budget Start
2011-05-23
Budget End
2011-11-30
Support Year
35
Fiscal Year
2011
Total Cost
$291,504
Indirect Cost
Name
University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
Department
Type
DUNS #
608195277
City
Chapel Hill
State
NC
Country
United States
Zip Code
27599
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