Bioinformatics is critical for any cancer center, allowing researchers to tap the ever-growing data sets afforded by new cancer research technologies. However daunting, massive data sets are being created, must be analyzed, and need to be related to translafional and clinical end points. LCCC expertise in this area began with the genomics program, particularly gene expression microarray analysis. By necessity, the personnel, computafional infrastructure, and broad faculty expertise was built through internal and external recruitment. In the last three years, capabilifies rapidly expanded to capture clinical data and annotate specimens. The Lineberger Data Warehouse (LDW) was created to allow Interactive use of mulfiple oracle based data repositories. With this expanded staff and mission, the genomics and bioinformatics were divided into two resources. The relafionships between the Bioinformatics, Biostatisfics and Data Management, Genomics and the new Next Generafion and Genotyping Core will be seamless. The Bioinformafic Core's goals are to confinue to provide bioinformafics tools, databases for the storage and analysis of genomic data, for the storage and analysis of clinical/pafient data, and to provide tools to link these disfinct data types together to foster translational research discoveries. Incorporafion of new enfifies, such as the Cancer Survivorship Cohort, is occurring. The key element remains the Bioinformafics Core Central Patient Registry which provides and tracks all pafients after assigning a unique research identifier. The group has significant experience with genomic database development and curation, genomic data analysis and tool development, clinical database development, and linking these together through the LDW. The core will expand capabilifies to include new genomic plafi'orms and new clinical databases/tumor types. The core requests $270,568, representing 13% of its total operating costs to accomplish its ambitious goals. All core use in 2009 was by members. The co-directors, Drs. Perou and Hayes, are leaders in genomic analysis and its integration with clinical endpoints.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
3P30CA016086-36S1
Application #
8532541
Study Section
Subcommittee G - Education (NCI)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2011-12-01
Budget End
2012-11-30
Support Year
36
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$2,552
Indirect Cost
$873
Name
University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
Department
Type
DUNS #
608195277
City
Chapel Hill
State
NC
Country
United States
Zip Code
27599
Malta, Tathiane M; Sokolov, Artem; Gentles, Andrew J et al. (2018) Machine Learning Identifies Stemness Features Associated with Oncogenic Dedifferentiation. Cell 173:338-354.e15
Lund, Jennifer L; Sanoff, Hanna K; Peacock Hinton, Sharon et al. (2018) Potential Medication-Related Problems in Older Breast, Colon, and Lung Cancer Patients in the United States. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 27:41-49
Smith, Jennifer S; Des Marais, Andrea C; Deal, Allison M et al. (2018) Mailed Human Papillomavirus Self-Collection With Papanicolaou Test Referral for Infrequently Screened Women in the United States. Sex Transm Dis 45:42-48
Morris, Michael J; Rumble, R Bryan; Basch, Ethan et al. (2018) Optimizing Anticancer Therapy in Metastatic Non-Castrate Prostate Cancer: American Society of Clinical Oncology Clinical Practice Guideline. J Clin Oncol 36:1521-1539
Hisada, Yohei; Thålin, Charlotte; Lundström, Staffan et al. (2018) Comparison of microvesicle tissue factor activity in non-cancer severely ill patients and cancer patients. Thromb Res 165:1-5
Westmoreland, Katherine D; El-Mallawany, Nader K; Kazembe, Peter et al. (2018) Dissecting heterogeneous outcomes for paediatric Burkitt lymphoma in Malawi after anthracycline-based treatment. Br J Haematol 181:853-854
Kulis, Michael; Yue, Xiaohong; Guo, Rishu et al. (2018) High- and low-dose oral immunotherapy similarly suppress pro-allergic cytokines and basophil activation in young children. Clin Exp Allergy :
Knott, Simon R V; Wagenblast, Elvin; Khan, Showkhin et al. (2018) Asparagine bioavailability governs metastasis in a model of breast cancer. Nature 554:378-381
Wu, Jing; Frady, Lauren N; Bash, Ryan E et al. (2018) MerTK as a therapeutic target in glioblastoma. Neuro Oncol 20:92-102
Wu, Shih-Ying; Fix, Samantha M; Arena, Christopher B et al. (2018) Focused ultrasound-facilitated brain drug delivery using optimized nanodroplets: vaporization efficiency dictates large molecular delivery. Phys Med Biol 63:035002

Showing the most recent 10 out of 1525 publications