Immunology The goals of the Immunology Program are to promote basic and translational science focusing on cancer immunobiology and to promote an environment conducive to intra and interprogrammatic collaborations. These goals are achieved by the recruitment and retention of outstanding basic and translational scientists, and the promotion of interactions with clinicians in the NC Cancer Hospital. The 25 members'research is organized into two major themes, innate and adaptive immunity. Within each of the themes are multiple subthemes with the innate immune theme focusing on cancer and inflammation with a spot light on colitis and colorectal cancer and hepatitis and hepatocellular carcinoma. Additional subthemes include dendritic cell biology, interactions between immune response and radiation biology, and novel pattern sensing receptors. The adaptive immune program is divided into three subthemes that include vaccine development, graft-versus-host biology and the role of migratory proteins in the interaction between T and B lymphocytes, tumor cells and the stroma. Research highlights include: (1) completion of the first clinical trial combining standard therapy with vaccine treatment for patients with breast cancer;(2) identification of the first mitochondrial NLR protein that recognizes viral nucleic acid;(3) preclinical development of an IKK inhibitor for the prevention of GvHD;(4) identification of novel pathways in which chemokines interact with migrating stromal cells to promote pulmonary metastasis;(5) new models and Insights into the interaction of innate immune cells as critical mediators of carcinogenesis in the Gl tract;and (6) the development of novel humanized mouse models to explore the interaction between the human immune system and the development of cancer. The program addes value to the Cancer Center by promoting preclinical studies into clinical therapies, forging collaborations between scientists, generating new collaborations between scientists and clinicians via retreats and monthly meetings, and providing funding support for novel translational and basic investigations. The program is led by Dr. Jenny Ting, Ph.D., a leader in innate and molecular immunology and Dr. Jonathan Serody, M.D., a leader in cellular immunology, In vivo imaging and vaccine development. In 2009 the program's 25 members had extramural funding totaling $16.2M (total costs).

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30CA016086-37
Application #
8392158
Study Section
Subcommittee G - Education (NCI)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2012-12-01
Budget End
2013-11-30
Support Year
37
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$170,333
Indirect Cost
$72,665
Name
University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
Department
Type
DUNS #
608195277
City
Chapel Hill
State
NC
Country
United States
Zip Code
27599
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