Bioinformatics is critical for any cancer center, allowing researchers to tap the ever-growing data sets afforded by new cancer research technologies. However daunting, massive data sets are being created, must be analyzed, and need to be related to translafional and clinical end points. LCCC expertise in this area began with the genomics program, particularly gene expression microarray analysis. By necessity, the personnel, computafional infrastructure, and broad faculty expertise was built through internal and external recruitment. In the last three years, capabilifies rapidly expanded to capture clinical data and annotate specimens. The Lineberger Data Warehouse (LDW) was created to allow Interactive use of mulfiple oracle based data repositories. With this expanded staff and mission, the genomics and bioinformatics were divided into two resources. The relafionships between the Bioinformatics, Biostatisfics and Data Management, Genomics and the new Next Generafion and Genotyping Core will be seamless. The Bioinformafic Core's goals are to confinue to provide bioinformafics tools, databases for the storage and analysis of genomic data, for the storage and analysis of clinical/pafient data, and to provide tools to link these disfinct data types together to foster translational research discoveries. Incorporafion of new enfifies, such as the Cancer Survivorship Cohort, is occurring. The key element remains the Bioinformafics Core Central Patient Registry which provides and tracks all pafients after assigning a unique research identifier. The group has significant experience with genomic database development and curation, genomic data analysis and tool development, clinical database development, and linking these together through the LDW. The core will expand capabilifies to include new genomic plafi'orms and new clinical databases/tumor types. The core requests $270,568, representing 13% of its total operating costs to accomplish its ambitious goals. All core use in 2009 was by members. The co-directors, Drs. Perou and Hayes, are leaders in genomic analysis and its integration with clinical endpoints.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30CA016086-38
Application #
8594166
Study Section
Subcommittee G - Education (NCI)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-12-01
Budget End
2014-11-30
Support Year
38
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$255,335
Indirect Cost
$66,183
Name
University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
Department
Type
DUNS #
608195277
City
Chapel Hill
State
NC
Country
United States
Zip Code
27599
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