The Biomolecular Analysis Facility (BAF) provides a centralized setfing for a diverse suite of services, instrumentation, and expertise projected through two areas: DNA Sciences and Mass Spectrometry/Proteomics. Together, the staff of the BAF provides expertise to Cancer Center Members for experimental design, execufion, and data analysis. The scope of services provided includes DNA sequencing and genomic analyses carried out via Sanger and """"""""next-gen"""""""" sequencing and gene expression and genotyping on microarray and real time PCR platforms;as well as protein identification, posttranslational modification analysis, complex mixture analysis and qualitative and quantitafive proteomics carried out via mass spectrometry. The consolidated organization of these technological areas not only allows for a seamless science flow from experimental genomics to proteomics but also allows for a collaborative synergy among the staff, with a sharing of resources and a mutual requirement for bioinformatic and informatic expertise and support. Further, this consolidation of services aligns with the recommendations from the National Center for Research Resources for core consolidation for the enhancement of service provision and cost-effecfiveness. Through the Cancer Center Execufive Committee and institufional Office of Resource Core Administration (ORCA) the BAF maintains a close working relationship with the Cancer Center and its members to ensure the services, protocols, reagents and expertise required are made available. In many instances these resources are specifically tailored to the needs of Cancer Center Members'research projects and grant applicafions.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30CA044579-23
Application #
8635292
Study Section
Subcommittee G - Education (NCI)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-02-01
Budget End
2015-01-31
Support Year
23
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$147,764
Indirect Cost
$61,140
Name
University of Virginia
Department
Type
DUNS #
065391526
City
Charlottesville
State
VA
Country
United States
Zip Code
22904
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