? DEVELOPMENTAL CORE Director: Ahmet Hoke, MD, PhD, Professor of Neurology and Neuroscience Co-Director: Amanda Brown PhD, Assistant Professor of Neurology Executive/review committee for this Core: Drs. Hoke, Brown, McArthur, Slusher, Pletnikov and Sacktor The JHU NIMH Center Developmental Core was established to promote innovative, high-risk, high-impact Neuro-AIDS research through the use of Pilot Project Grants. In the previous cycle, the Developmental Core funded 29 Pilot Projects, which led to 37 extramural applications, of which 21 were funded, highlighting the success of the Core. In order to continue to the goal of encouraging highly innovative research, especially in therapeutics development, the Development Core will promote cross-disciplinary collaborations and fund innovative projects, particularly from investigators new to the neuroAIDS field. In this regard, this Core has also collaborated with existing JHU programs to support trainees from under represented backgrounds in the field of neuroaids. The Development Core will accomplish its goals through a competitive grant submission process and a mentorship program that will include the use of an individual development plan (IDP), particularly for new investigators. The success of the Developmental Core will be closely monitored by evaluating the successes and outcomes of the previous awardees in applying and securing additional grant funding and in career advancement. Importantly, our trainees research projects on trafficking of noncoding RNAs, sleep disorders and cognitive function, amyloid imaging in aged HIV+ individuals, and the role of platelets in the establishment of latent viral reservoirs, illustrate how the Developmental Core has served as an avenue to usher the JHU NIMH Center into new research directions.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Mental Health (NIMH)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
5P30MH075673-12
Application #
9538806
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZMH1)
Project Start
2006-06-16
Project End
Budget Start
2018-03-01
Budget End
2019-02-28
Support Year
12
Fiscal Year
2018
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
Johns Hopkins University
Department
Type
DUNS #
001910777
City
Baltimore
State
MD
Country
United States
Zip Code
21205
Rojas, Camilo; Stathis, Marigo; Coughlin, Jennifer M et al. (2018) The Low-Affinity Binding of Second Generation Radiotracers Targeting TSPO is Associated with a Unique Allosteric Binding Site. J Neuroimmune Pharmacol 13:1-5
Chan, Parco; Saleem, Mahwesh; Herrmann, Nathan et al. (2018) Ceramide Accumulation Is Associated with Declining Verbal Memory in Coronary Artery Disease Patients: An Observational Study. J Alzheimers Dis 64:1235-1246
Mohamed, M; Barker, P B; Skolasky, R L et al. (2018) 7T Brain MRS in HIV Infection: Correlation with Cognitive Impairment and Performance on Neuropsychological Tests. AJNR Am J Neuroradiol 39:704-712
Sacktor, Ned; Skolasky, Richard L; Moxley, Richard et al. (2018) Paroxetine and fluconazole therapy for HIV-associated neurocognitive impairment: results from a double-blind, placebo-controlled trial. J Neurovirol 24:16-27
Barinka, Cyril; Novakova, Zora; Hin, Niyada et al. (2018) Structural and computational basis for potent inhibition of glutamate carboxypeptidase II by carbamate-based inhibitors. Bioorg Med Chem :
Lemberg, Kathryn M; Vornov, James J; Rais, Rana et al. (2018) We're Not ""DON"" Yet: Optimal Dosing and Prodrug Delivery of 6-Diazo-5-oxo-L-norleucine. Mol Cancer Ther 17:1824-1832
Capó-Vélez, Coral M; Delgado-Vélez, Manuel; Báez-Pagán, Carlos A et al. (2018) Nicotinic Acetylcholine Receptors in HIV: Possible Roles During HAND and Inflammation. Cell Mol Neurobiol :
Nedelcovych, Michael T; Gadiano, Alexandra J; Wu, Ying et al. (2018) Pharmacokinetics of Intranasal versus Subcutaneous Insulin in the Mouse. ACS Chem Neurosci 9:809-816
Sacktor, Ned (2018) Changing clinical phenotypes of HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. J Neurovirol 24:141-145
Capó-Vélez, Coral M; Morales-Vargas, Bryan; García-González, Aurian et al. (2018) The alpha7-nicotinic receptor contributes to gp120-induced neurotoxicity: implications in HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders. Sci Rep 8:1829

Showing the most recent 10 out of 164 publications