The most important function of the Administrative core is to facilitate communication and thus interaction among research projects and cores. This exchange promotes a structure and atmosphere where interdisciplinary research and training takes place. Its procedural function is to provide fiscal and administrative support to the components of the program. It also serves to focus the individual projects on goals ofthe Superfund Program, and it serves as a conduit for program information to NIEHS, agencies, and citizens. It also serves as an interface with the University and other Superfund Programs in the nation. Four committees within the administrative core assist with these goals. The PI reports directly to the Vice Chancellor for Research at the University and is advised by an internal Executive Committee. An External Review Committee evaluates the relevance and quality of the research of individual projects and the integration of the entire program project. A Training Committee provides a rich interdisciplinary environment for pre and postdoctoral training. It coordinates the activities of the Training Core C, advises the Training Core Director and distributes funding from this core. Finally a Research Translation Advisory Committee guides the activities and goals of the Research Translation Core including program-government partnerships, technology transfer and communication of research information and products to broader audiences. It acts as a conduit to stake holders and advised the director of this core. The goals of the Administrative Core are accomplished through 3 specific objectives including: providing fiscal management and administrative support, facilitating scientific activities (research, training and communication), and disseminating information gained within the general framework of the Superfund Program.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
Type
Hazardous Substances Basic Research Grants Program (NIEHS) (P42)
Project #
5P42ES004699-27
Application #
8450309
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZES1-LWJ-M (O1))
Program Officer
Henry, Heather F
Project Start
1997-04-01
Project End
2015-03-31
Budget Start
2013-04-01
Budget End
2014-03-31
Support Year
27
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$2,429,524
Indirect Cost
$864,119
Name
University of California Davis
Department
Zoology
Type
Schools of Earth Sciences/Natur
DUNS #
047120084
City
Davis
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
95618
Guedes, A G P; Aristizabal, F; Sole, A et al. (2018) Pharmacokinetics and antinociceptive effects of the soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitor t-TUCB in horses with experimentally induced radiocarpal synovitis. J Vet Pharmacol Ther 41:230-238
Heikenfeld, J; Jajack, A; Rogers, J et al. (2018) Wearable sensors: modalities, challenges, and prospects. Lab Chip 18:217-248
Minaz, Nathani; Razdan, Rema; Hammock, Bruce D et al. (2018) An inhibitor of soluble epoxide hydrolase ameliorates diabetes-induced learning and memory impairment in rats. Prostaglandins Other Lipid Mediat 136:84-89
Lassabe, Gabriel; Kramer, Karl; Hammock, Bruce D et al. (2018) Noncompetitive Homogeneous Detection of Small Molecules Using Synthetic Nanopeptamer-Based Luminescent Oxygen Channeling. Anal Chem 90:6187-6192
?ertíková Chábová, V?ra; Kujal, Petr; Škaroupková, Petra et al. (2018) Combined Inhibition of Soluble Epoxide Hydrolase and Renin-Angiotensin System Exhibits Superior Renoprotection to Renin-Angiotensin System Blockade in 5/6 Nephrectomized Ren-2 Transgenic Hypertensive Rats with Established Chronic Kidney Disease. Kidney Blood Press Res 43:329-349
Kodani, Sean D; Bhakta, Saavan; Hwang, Sung Hee et al. (2018) Identification and optimization of soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibitors with dual potency towards fatty acid amide hydrolase. Bioorg Med Chem Lett 28:762-768
Rand, Amy A; Helmer, Patrick O; Inceoglu, Bora et al. (2018) LC-MS/MS Analysis of the Epoxides and Diols Derived from the Endocannabinoid Arachidonoyl Ethanolamide. Methods Mol Biol 1730:123-133
Li, Xueshu; Holland, Erika B; Feng, Wei et al. (2018) Authentication of synthetic environmental contaminants and their (bio)transformation products in toxicology: polychlorinated biphenyls as an example. Environ Sci Pollut Res Int 25:16508-16521
Mao, Yuxin; Pan, Yang; Li, Xuan et al. (2018) High-precision digital droplet pipetting enabled by a plug-and-play microfluidic pipetting chip. Lab Chip 18:2720-2729
Burmistrov, Vladimir; Morisseau, Christophe; Harris, Todd R et al. (2018) Effects of adamantane alterations on soluble epoxide hydrolase inhibition potency, physical properties and metabolic stability. Bioorg Chem 76:510-527

Showing the most recent 10 out of 1149 publications