Molecular biology has the potential to make extraordinary contributions to our understanding of Alzheimer's disease. During the next decade, these approaches will continue to enhance our understanding of the cellular/molecular pathology that occurs in aging, Alzheimer's disease, and Down's syndrome. For example, the basic mechanisms of amyloidogenesis certainly require the use of molecular biological strategies (Project 1- 3). The professional staff of Core E is experienced in molecular biology, neurobiology, neuropathology, immunology, protein chemistry, and computer-imaging technology. Components of Core E include: character ion of complementary DNA: preparation and utilization of nucleotide probes; analyses of DNA, RNA, and proteins; tissue and cell cultures; and computerized image analysis. By interacting with other Cores and Projects, Core E will provide professional expertise and laboratory resources for investigations of the pathogenesis of brain abnormalities that occur in aged controls, subjects with Alzheimer's disease, and individuals with Down's syndrome.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Type
Specialized Center (P50)
Project #
5P50AG005146-08
Application #
3809240
Study Section
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
Budget End
Support Year
8
Fiscal Year
1990
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
Johns Hopkins University
Department
Type
DUNS #
045911138
City
Baltimore
State
MD
Country
United States
Zip Code
21218
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