The two primary goals of Core C Bioinformatics and Integrative/Comparative Genomics Core are (1) to provide the common computational infrastructure and bioinformatics support for high-throughput, systematic data curation, exchange and translation, and (2) to develop, apply and automate computational integrative/comparative genomics methods on microarray-derived transcriptome data, across the different Project model systems. An integrative and comparative genomics approach will enable each Program Project to use diverse muscle and non-muscle transcriptome data sets from all Program Projects and the public domain to generate hypotheses about candidate genes, functional dependencies or pathways that are important in muscular dystrophies, muscle development and myogenic cell therapy. The approach combines information from public databases of bio-molecular functions and interactions, and multiple-genome sequence data to prioritize further experimental studies in the different model systems. The three aims of Core C are: (1) to establish an integrative computational infrastructure for data storage, curation and automated cross-systems matching of genomic data elements;(2) to develop and implement computational methods for integrative/comparative functional genomics;and (3) to use integrative/comparative genomics techniques to systematically identify or infer functional hierarchies underlying developmental aspects of muscle cells and specific myopathies for further experimental validation.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Type
Specialized Center (P50)
Project #
5P50NS040828-09
Application #
8049595
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZNS1)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2010-04-01
Budget End
2011-03-31
Support Year
9
Fiscal Year
2010
Total Cost
$150,337
Indirect Cost
Name
Children's Hospital Boston
Department
Type
DUNS #
076593722
City
Boston
State
MA
Country
United States
Zip Code
02115
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