The Administrative Core of the Center for the Study of Complex Malaria in India (CSCMi), headquartered at the NIMR in New Delhi, will provide day-to-day and strategic administrative and accounting support, reports of finances, communications infrastructure, liaison with suppliers, travel and visa support, and website support for the Center. The Administrafive Core will also provide logistical support for, and document the activifies of, the Scientific Acfivifies committee which will be established to review and advise on CSCMi research project progress. The Administrafive Core will provide similar support for the annual ICEMR Workshop when it is held at the CSCMi, as well as logisfical and travel support CSCMi employees attending the Workshops at other ICEMRs. Thus the Core will be a indispensible component of CSCMi function, enabling the Center to reach its goal of becoming a multidisciplinary research center in India that integrates clinical and field studies with laboratory, molecular, and genomic methods for malaria control and prevention.

Public Health Relevance

Malaria is a major public health problem in India, the world's largest democracy and second most populous country. This Core provides all the administrative and accounting support needed to operate the the Center for the Study of Complex Malaria in India, which is dedicated to enhancing the mialaria intervention and control programs of Indian government organizafions.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Type
Research Program--Cooperative Agreements (U19)
Project #
1U19AI089676-01
Application #
8008995
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAI1-AWA-M (M2))
Project Start
2010-07-01
Project End
2017-06-30
Budget Start
2010-07-01
Budget End
2011-06-30
Support Year
1
Fiscal Year
2010
Total Cost
$142,949
Indirect Cost
Name
New York University
Department
Type
DUNS #
121911077
City
New York
State
NY
Country
United States
Zip Code
10016
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