The infection of HHV-6 occurs very early in childhood (under one year) and virus remains for life in a latent state. Using the peripheral mononuclear cells in culture from HIV-1-positive AIDS, chronic fatigue syndrome (CFS), systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients and bone marrow transplant recipients, a high frequency of virus activation (40%) compared to normal donors (12%) was detected indicating active virus replication. HHV-6 was found to induce IL-1b and TNF-a in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. In contradistinction, HHV-6 has no effect on IL-6 induction. Cytokine induction appeared to be mediated by early viral protein. Cytokine production by HHV-6 in cells suggests how HHV-6 may contribute to disease manifestation. HHV-6 antigen-positive cells were detected by in situ hybridization and by monoclonal antibody assays in Hodgkins disease, (HD), AIDS, SLE and Sjogren's syndrome patients' cells. The virus DNA-positive cells expressed CD38+, CD4+, and to lower degree CD8+ and CD21+ cell receptors. Using ELISA and HHV-6 early protein (P41/38), sera from African Burkitt's lymphoma (ABL), HD and American Burkitt's lymphoma (AmBL) showed high frequency of antibody to P41/38 (ABL, 96.5%; HD, 62.5%) compared to normals (12%), whereas ELISA to HHV-6 late antigen (gp110) failed to detect these differences. These findings indicated active HHV-6 replication and suggested a possible role of this virus in the pathogenesis of these malignancies. Thus, this assay may be a good marker for active and chronic HHV-6 infections.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Intramural Research (Z01)
Project #
1Z01CP005063-14
Application #
3838329
Study Section
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
Budget End
Support Year
14
Fiscal Year
1992
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
Division of Cancer Epidemiology and Genetics
Department
Type
DUNS #
City
State
Country
United States
Zip Code