NSF/CBMS Regional Conference in the Mathematical Sciences-"Mathematical Epidemiology with Applications"-July 18-22, 2011

The criticality of mathematical tools applied to better understand transmission, spread and control of infectious diseases is assuming new importance, in light of recent epidemics, such as those caused by SARS and H1N1 viruses. Up-to-date epidemic analyses incorporate cultural, political, and social factors along side with international travel. The NSF-CBMS Regional Research Conference "Mathematical Epidemiology with Applications" will introduce a new generation of mathematical scientists to this exciting area, while setting in place collaborations and working groups that will generate much more research in the years to come.

The conference will feature ten keynote lectures by two leading experts in the field of mathematical epidemiology, Professor Fred Brauer of the University of British Columbia, and Professor Carlos Castillo-Chavez of Arizona State University.

Project Report

Intellectual Merits: The criticality of mathematical tools applied to better understand transmission, spread and control of infectious diseases is assuming new importance, in light of recent epidemics, such as those caused by SARS and H1N1 viruses. The conference lectures reinforced this fact. In addition, the breakout sessions in the afternoons promoted new research directions, in areas classified as follows: Modeling Classroom Learning as Epidemics Saving the World from Vector-Borne Disease Climate & Disease Theoretical Modeling of Infectious Diseases Parameter Estimation & Optimal Control Drug Resistance & Invasion Dynamics Network Rockstars Up-to-date epidemic analyses incorporate cultural, political, and social factors along side with international travel. The NSF-CBMS Regional Research Conference Mathematical Epidemiology with Applications introduced a new generation of mathematical scientists to this exciting area, while setting in place collaborations and working groups that will generate much more research in the years to come. Some of the participants comments included the following: "Good sense of community built"; "Enthusiasm of participants"; "Free atmosphere to talk and work with each other"; "It was possible to come into contact with most of the attendees"; "Size of the conference makes it personable and easy to meet people". The ten lectures will be published in a SIAM monograph tentatively entitled Mathematical Epidemiology and Applications. Broader Impacts: The conference was preceded by a research-based undergraduate class that prepared students for the lectures of Castillo-Chavez and Brauer. The same students presented posters highlighting their undergraduate research. After the conference, the PIs led a semester-long seminar that extended the participants' training and which led to collaborations. Finally, a wide spectrum of mathematicians attended the conference. The demographic details are as follows: Total number of participants: 59 Number of participants receiving support through grant: 59 Number of graduate students: 22 Number of postdocs: 1 Number of women: 22 Number of minorities: 5 Number of undergraduate students: 14

Agency
National Science Foundation (NSF)
Institute
Division of Mathematical Sciences (DMS)
Type
Standard Grant (Standard)
Application #
1040928
Program Officer
Jennifer Slimowitz Pearl
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2011-05-01
Budget End
2012-04-30
Support Year
Fiscal Year
2010
Total Cost
$38,726
Indirect Cost
Name
East Tennessee State University
Department
Type
DUNS #
City
Johnson City
State
TN
Country
United States
Zip Code
37614