Due to increased screenings with better screening tools breast cancer is detected earlier. This implies that higher resolution diagnostic tools are required for managing smaller sized tumors. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography (PET) has been known to be an effective modality in staging primary tumors and monitoring chemotherapy. Research has shown that FDG-PET is capable of predicting pathological response of primary tumor to chemotherapy agents, but the spatial resolution of current systems limits them to tumors larger than 2 cm. The goal of this project is to prove that the spatial resolution of present dedicated breast PET/CT systems can be improved to sub millimeter spatial resolution using a high-resolution detector insert. In order to prove this principle this project aims specifically to construct and characterized a detector with tiny scintillating crystals made of lutetium oxyorthosilicate. This detector is then adapted to a dedicated PET system previously designed and fabricated in this lab. After this the combined performance of the high-resolution detector and the moderate resolution detector will be characterized. The spatial resolution after tomographic reconstruction and sensitivity will be measured. The proposed research plan is tailored to engage the applicant in the participation of translational cancer bioengineering research. The sponsor will provide the resources, space, and equipment for the applicant to carry out the necessary science and engineering tasks. A timeline of courses and field related seminars are included in the training plan to enhance the training experience. The accomplishments of the stated goals will better prepare the applicant in becoming a translational researcher and representative of Hispanic minorities in the field, hence promoting diversity.

Public Health Relevance

The proposed research plan is tailored to engage the applicant in the participation of translational cancer bioengineering research. The sponsor will provide the resources, space, and equipment for the applicant to carry out the necessary science and engineering tasks to develop a cancer detection device. The accomplishments of the stated goals will better prepare the applicant in becoming a translational researcher and representative of Hispanic minorities in the field, hence promoting diversity. !

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Cancer Institute (NCI)
Type
Predoctoral Individual National Research Service Award (F31)
Project #
5F31CA157213-02
Application #
8337867
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZRG1-F15-D (20))
Program Officer
Bini, Alessandra M
Project Start
2011-09-01
Project End
2014-08-31
Budget Start
2012-09-01
Budget End
2013-08-31
Support Year
2
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$33,575
Indirect Cost
Name
University of California Davis
Department
Radiation-Diagnostic/Oncology
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
047120084
City
Davis
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
95618