Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States and its numbers are increasing. Deaths from skin cancer are due mostly to melanoma, whose numbers are also increasing. Thin melanomas (less than 1 mm in thickness) removed by surgery are associated with normal life, but thicker melanomas (more than 4 mm) are considered to have already spread to lymph nodes or distant organs, and cannot be cured by available treatments. Having discovered melanoma to contain molecules preventing the immune system from killing the tumor, we will study how to counteract these molecules so the immune system can better fight this deadly cancer.

Public Health Relevance

Melanoma is an important cause of mortality and morbidity in the United States, including patients seen and managed at Veterans Affairs Medical Centers. Despite recent advances in our knowledge of melanoma genetics and immunobiology, much remains to be learned. Having discovered a molecular pathway consisting of DC-HIL on melanoma and syndecan-4 on T cells, whose binding disables the immune system from optimally fighting the tumor, we will test the hypotheses that this pathway can be manipulated for therapeutic gain.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
Veterans Affairs (VA)
Type
Non-HHS Research Projects (I01)
Project #
1I01BX000896-01A1
Application #
8142520
Study Section
Oncology A (ONCA)
Project Start
2011-10-01
Project End
2015-09-30
Budget Start
2011-10-01
Budget End
2012-09-30
Support Year
1
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
VA North Texas Health Care System
Department
Type
DUNS #
007369325
City
Dallas
State
TX
Country
United States
Zip Code
75216