This is a request for 5 years of funding through the "Mentored Research Scientist Development Award" (K01) mechanism. The applicant, Dr. Colleen Hanlon, is a neurobiologist with experience using functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine neural networks affected in chronic cocaine users. To further characterize changes in cortical activity in cocaine users, this application proposes a program of training in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). The long- term goal of the applicant is to become an independent investigator, skilled in the application of multiple imaging modalities that may be used to guide treatment strategies in substance abusing populations. The training plan includes structured training courses in TMS acquisition and analysis, DTI image analysis, and multivariate statistics, as well as ongoing training by a team of mentors. Career development is also a strong component of this application with time devoted to Training in the Responsible Conduct of Research, manuscript and grant writing, mentoring students, attendance at scientific meetings, and interactions with the institutional review board. The research component of this award extends prior NIH-funded research complete by Dr. Hanlon, and has been carefully designed to parallel the training plan. The overarching goal of this proposal is to determine the extent to which changes in corpus callosum integrity (Specific Aim #1) and cortical inhibitory tone (Specific Aim #2) are related to atypical BOLD signal changes in the cortex of chronic cocaine users. In addition to extending investigations on sensorimotor laterality, the impact of loss of cortical laterality on cognitive function in cocaine users will also be addressed (Specific Aim #3). These experiments will reveal the extent to which changes in cortical inhibitory tone and corpus callosal integrity may contribute to neurofunctional and behavioral deficiencies in chronic cocaine users. The results of these experiments will be used to further the investigation and development of therapeutic treatment strategies in stimulant dependent individuals.

Public Health Relevance

This is a request for 5 years of funding through the "Mentored Research Scientist Development Award" (K01) mechanism. The applicant, Dr. Colleen Hanlon, is a neurobiologist with experience using functional magnetic resonance imaging to examine neural networks affected in chronic cocaine users. To further characterize changes in cortical activity in cocaine users, this application proposes a program of training in diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) and transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS). The long- term goal of the applicant is to become an independent investigator, skilled in the application of multiple imaging modalities that may be used to guide treatment strategies in substance abusing populations. The training plan includes structured training courses in TMS acquisition and analysis, DTI image analysis, and multivariate statistics, as well as ongoing training by a team of mentors. Career development is also a strong component of this application with time devoted to Training in the Responsible Conduct of Research, manuscript and grant writing, mentoring students, attendance at scientific meetings, and interactions with the institutional review board. The research component of this award extends prior NIH-funded research complete by Dr. Hanlon, and has been carefully designed to parallel the training plan. The overarching goal of this proposal is to determine the extent to which changes in corpus callosum integrity (Specific Aim #1) and cortical inhibitory tone (Specific Aim #2) are related to atypical BOLD signal changes in the cortex of chronic cocaine users. In addition to extending investigations on sensorimotor laterality, the impact of loss of cortical laterality on cognitive function in cocaine users will also be addressed (Specific Aim #3). These experiments will reveal the extent to which changes in cortical inhibitory tone and corpus callosal integrity may contribute to neurofunctional and behavioral deficiencies in chronic cocaine users. The results of these experiments will be used to further the investigation and development of therapeutic treatment strategies in stimulant dependent individuals.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Type
Research Scientist Development Award - Research & Training (K01)
Project #
5K01DA027756-05
Application #
8596808
Study Section
Human Development Research Subcommittee (NIDA)
Program Officer
Gordon, Harold
Project Start
2010-01-15
Project End
2014-12-31
Budget Start
2014-01-01
Budget End
2014-12-31
Support Year
5
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$167,930
Indirect Cost
$11,609
Name
Medical University of South Carolina
Department
Psychiatry
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
183710748
City
Charleston
State
SC
Country
United States
Zip Code
29425
Hanlon, Colleen A; Owens, Max M; Joseph, Jane E et al. (2016) Lower subcortical gray matter volume in both younger smokers and established smokers relative to non-smokers. Addict Biol 21:185-95
Moran-Santa Maria, Megan M; Hartwell, Karen J; Hanlon, Colleen A et al. (2015) Right anterior insula connectivity is important for cue-induced craving in nicotine-dependent smokers. Addict Biol 20:407-14
Hanlon, Colleen A; Dowdle, Logan T; Austelle, Christopher W et al. (2015) What goes up, can come down: Novel brain stimulation paradigms may attenuate craving and craving-related neural circuitry in substance dependent individuals. Brain Res 1628:199-209
Hanlon, Colleen A; DeVries, William; Dowdle, Logan T et al. (2015) A comprehensive study of sensorimotor cortex excitability in chronic cocaine users: Integrating TMS and functional MRI data. Drug Alcohol Depend 157:28-35
Hanlon, Colleen A; Dowdle, Logan T; Naselaris, Thomas et al. (2014) Visual cortex activation to drug cues: a meta-analysis of functional neuroimaging papers in addiction and substance abuse literature. Drug Alcohol Depend 143:206-12
Stoeckel, L E; Garrison, K A; Ghosh, S et al. (2014) Optimizing real time fMRI neurofeedback for therapeutic discovery and development. Neuroimage Clin 5:245-55
Hanlon, Colleen A; Canterberry, Melanie; Taylor, Joseph J et al. (2013) Probing the frontostriatal loops involved in executive and limbic processing via interleaved TMS and functional MRI at two prefrontal locations: a pilot study. PLoS One 8:e67917
Hanlon, Colleen A; Hartwell, Karen J; Canterberry, Melanie et al. (2013) Reduction of cue-induced craving through realtime neurofeedback in nicotine users: the role of region of interest selection and multiple visits. Psychiatry Res 213:79-81
Goldman, Rachel L; Canterberry, Melanie; Borckardt, Jeffrey J et al. (2013) Executive control circuitry differentiates degree of success in weight loss following gastric-bypass surgery. Obesity (Silver Spring) 21:2189-96
Canterberry, Melanie; Hanlon, Colleen A; Hartwell, Karen J et al. (2013) Sustained reduction of nicotine craving with real-time neurofeedback: exploring the role of severity of dependence. Nicotine Tob Res 15:2120-4

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