This K02 re-submission seeks salary support for Mehmet Sofuoglu, M.D., Ph.D. The candidate has a Ph.D. in pharmacology and has developed expertise in behavioral pharmacology including intravenous challenge studies with cocaine and nicotine in humans. He is currently an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at the Yale University School of Medicine. Dr. Sofuoglu has built an innovative research program on development of novel pharmacological treatments for cocaine and nicotine addiction. He has established a strong publication record, national recognition, and independent funding for his work in nicotine and cocaine addiction. His main research interests are: 1) neurobiological mechanisms of sex and menstrual cycle effects on stimulant addiction and 2) the GABA and adrenergic system as targets for the pharmacotherapy of stimulant addiction. During the next 5 years, the candidate will focus on two R01 projects. The first project, """"""""GABA Medications and Tobacco Addiction"""""""" is a human laboratory study and will examine the dose-dependent effects of GABA enhancing medication tiagabine on smoking behavior, tobacco withdrawal severity, and craving for cigarettes in male and female smokers. The second project """"""""Cocaine Withdrawal and Pharmacotherapy Response"""""""" is an outpatient clinical trial and will evaluate the efficacy of a beta- and alpha- adrenergic blocker, carvedilol for pharmacotherapy of cocaine addiction. Both these projects are consistent with the candidate's long-term research interest in medications development for addictive disorders. The candidate is seeking a K02 award to receive further training and gain expertise in other fields that will further expand his research scope including neurobiology of sex hormones and neurosteroids, and clinical trials methodology. To reach these training goals, the candidate proposes an educational program including coursework and mentoring from senior colleagues with relevant expertise. This K02 application will provide support for the candidate's sustained research in areas of cocaine and nicotine addiction.

National Institute of Health (NIH)
National Institute on Drug Abuse (NIDA)
Research Scientist Development Award - Research (K02)
Project #
Application #
Study Section
Human Development Research Subcommittee (NIDA)
Program Officer
Bough, Kristopher J
Project Start
Project End
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Budget End
Support Year
Fiscal Year
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Yale University
Schools of Medicine
New Haven
United States
Zip Code
Leeman, Robert F; Sun, Qisi; Bogart, Devorah et al. (2016) Comparisons of Cocaine-Only, Opioid-Only, and Users of Both Substances in the National Epidemiologic Survey on Alcohol and Related Conditions (NESARC). Subst Use Misuse 51:553-64
Herman, Aryeh I; DeVito, Elise E; Jensen, Kevin P et al. (2014) Pharmacogenetics of nicotine addiction: role of dopamine. Pharmacogenomics 15:221-34
Leeman, Robert F; Robinson, Cendrine D; Waters, Andrew J et al. (2014) A critical review of the literature on attentional bias in cocaine use disorder and suggestions for future research. Exp Clin Psychopharmacol 22:469-83
Sofuoglu, Mehmet; Rosenheck, Robert; Petrakis, Ismene (2014) Pharmacological treatment of comorbid PTSD and substance use disorder: recent progress. Addict Behav 39:428-33
Forray, Ariadna; Sofuoglu, Mehmet (2014) Future pharmacological treatments for substance use disorders. Br J Clin Pharmacol 77:382-400
Morean, Meghan E; de Wit, Harriet; King, Andrea C et al. (2013) The drug effects questionnaire: psychometric support across three drug types. Psychopharmacology (Berl) 227:177-92
Sofuoglu, Mehmet; DeVito, Elise E; Waters, Andrew J et al. (2013) Cognitive enhancement as a treatment for drug addictions. Neuropharmacology 64:452-63
Sofuoglu, Mehmet (2012) Commentary on Ling et al. (2012): The PROMETAâ„¢ treatment does not reduce methamphetamine use. Addiction 107:370-1
Sofuoglu, Mehmet; LeSage, Mark G (2012) The reinforcement threshold for nicotine as a target for tobacco control. Drug Alcohol Depend 125:1-7
Sofuoglu, Mehmet; Herman, Aryeh I; Nadim, Haleh et al. (2012) Rapid nicotine clearance is associated with greater reward and heart rate increases from intravenous nicotine. Neuropsychopharmacology 37:1509-16

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