This resubmitted proposal has been revised according to Reviewer recommendations. It requests a 5-year K23 Career Development Award for Dr. Aleksandra Zgierska to develop research expertise in the empirical assessment of new therapies for alcohol dependence and prepare her to be a tenured clinician-scientist in alcohol research. BACKGROUND: Alcohol dependence is a common disorder with high patient and societal burden. Therapy outcomes are often not satisfactory and relapse is common. Meditation, an innovative behavioral therapy, is effective for many medical and mental health conditions. Preliminary evidence supports its use for addictive disorders. No rigorous study has evaluated its efficacy in alcohol dependence. QUALIFICATIONS: Dr. Zgierska is a Family Medicine and Addiction Medicine physician;she obtained a PhD in sleep physiology, has participated in clinical research in addictive disorders, and conducted and published the results of a promising pilot study evaluating meditation in alcohol dependence. She is completing an NIAAA research fellowship at the University of Wisconsin Department of Family Medicine (UW DFM). ENVIRONMENT: The UW Medical School and DFM are committed to Dr. Zgierska's progress. The UW, with its access to experts in alcohol and behavioral therapies, basic science, randomized clinical trial (RCT) methodology and biostatistics, is an ideal environment for the proposed work. It is associated with collaborating addiction treatment centers from which to recruit subjects. TRAINING: Through expert mentoring, coursework and experiential learning, Dr. Zgierska will build on her existing clinical and research base, and advance her skills in the clinical research and alcohol fields. RESEARCH: During the Award period, Dr. Zgierska will conduct an RCT evaluating the efficacy and possible mechanisms of action of meditation as a therapy for relapse prevention in alcohol dependence. SIGNIFICANCE: If received, this award will facilitate 1) Dr. Zgierska's training to become an independent clinician-scientist, and 2) the assessment of meditation, a promising innovative behavioral therapy for alcohol dependence.

Public Health Relevance

The proposed research will evaluate meditation, an innovative behavioral intervention, as a therapy for alcohol dependence, a common, debilitating and expensive condition, for which existing treatment outcomes are often not satisfactory. This research may benefit the community and society-at-large, as well as the individual study subjects if meditation proves an effective therapy for alcohol dependence.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism (NIAAA)
Type
Mentored Patient-Oriented Research Career Development Award (K23)
Project #
5K23AA017508-05
Application #
8451199
Study Section
Health Services Research Review Subcommittee (AA)
Program Officer
Lowman, Cherry
Project Start
2009-04-10
Project End
2014-03-31
Budget Start
2013-04-01
Budget End
2014-03-31
Support Year
5
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$168,587
Indirect Cost
$12,488
Name
University of Wisconsin Madison
Department
Family Medicine
Type
Schools of Medicine
DUNS #
161202122
City
Madison
State
WI
Country
United States
Zip Code
53715
Zgierska, Aleksandra; Wallace, Margaret L; Burzinski, Cindy A et al. (2014) Pharmacological and toxicological profile of opioid-treated, chronic low back pain patients entering a mindfulness intervention randomized controlled trial. J Opioid Manag 10:323-35
Rabago, David; Zgierska, Aleksandra; Fortney, Luke et al. (2012) Hypertonic dextrose injections (prolotherapy) for knee osteoarthritis: results of a single-arm uncontrolled study with 1-year follow-up. J Altern Complement Med 18:408-14
Zgierska, Aleksandra; Marcus, Marianne T (2010) Mindfulness-based therapies for substance use disorders: part 2. Subst Abus 31:77-8
Zgierska, Aleksandra; Rabago, David; Chawla, Neharika et al. (2009) Mindfulness meditation for substance use disorders: a systematic review. Subst Abus 30:266-94
Marcus, Marianne T; Zgierska, Aleksandra (2009) Mindfulness-based therapies for substance use disorders: part 1. Subst Abus 30:263-5