The Center will be comprised of four integrated functional units: The Administrative Core, The Data Management/ Statistical Core, The Dissemination Core and The Research Programs at each of the three Universities (Figure 3). The Administrative Core will provide leadership for the Center and oversight and direction for all its activities. The Core will assume primary responsibility for ensuring that the science of the Center is of high quality and for fostering collaborations among the three sites and community/ industry. The Core will also work to expand the research program of the Center and help to ensure that the outcomes of the Center are disseminated to designers, scientists, policy makers, and the community. In summary, the overall aims of the Administrative Core are to: (1) provide leadership for the Center and direction for all of its activities;(2) facilitate cross-site collaborations;(3) facilitate linkages between the Center and the External Scientific Advisory Board (ESAB) and NIH;(4) facilitate linkages between the Center and the community, relevant government agencies and business/industry;(5) provide technical support for the research projects; (6) assist with participant recruitment and the administration of the common core battery of measures;(7) manage the cross-site field trial;(8) assume responsibility for the administration of the Pilot Research Program;(9) integrate and support the activities of the Data Management/Statistical and Dissemination Cores;and (10) promote and facilitate expansion of the Center's research program. The Administrative Core will build on existing structures developed for CREATE I &II and the collaborative relationships that are already in place.

Public Health Relevance

A complex multi-site research Center requires an Administrative Core to ensure: coordination of the activities of the sites;timely progress of the planned activities;efficient and effective use of resources;sharing on intellectual and physical resources;and expansion of the Center's activities. The Core is also needed to foster collaborations with other researchers, community agencies and industry and with the External Scientific Advisory Board and Data and Safety Monitoring Board

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
5P01AG017211-15
Application #
8526304
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAG1-ZIJ-3)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2013-08-01
Budget End
2014-07-31
Support Year
15
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$453,389
Indirect Cost
$161,845
Name
University of Miami School of Medicine
Department
Type
DUNS #
052780918
City
Coral Gables
State
FL
Country
United States
Zip Code
33146
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