Is it true that males are healthier than females but die younger? If so, why? We plan demographic analyses to address these two overarching questions concerning the health-survival paradox. First, to what extent is the paradox true? How general is it? * According to which definitions and measures and along which dimensions are men healthier than women? * How do male-female morbidity and mortality differences vary with age? * How do they vary over place? * How have they varied over time? * How do they vary across species of mammals, birds, reptiles, amphibians and fish? Second, to the extent that the paradox is true, why is this the case? Various social and biological hypotheses will be tested by analyzing: Human and nonhuman lifetables (Project 1); Survey and register data on humans in Denmark (Project 2); Survey data on humans in the United States (Project 3) and in Japan, the Philippines and Singapore (Project 4); Longitudinal observations on baboons in the wild in Kenya (Project 5); Longitudinal data on lemurs in the wild on Madagascar and in captivity at Duke and in France (Project 6);and Laboratory data on fruit flies (Project 7). The combination of informative animal models and high-quality human data and sophisticated demographic analyses will provide a deeper understanding of the basis for sex differences in health and survival and of opportunities to reduce these differences.

Public Health Relevance

Is it true that males are healthier than females but die younger? If so, why? This program project supports research projects that address these questions concerning the human health-survival paradox. Findings will provide a deeper understanding of the basis for sex differences in health and survival-and of the opportunities that society and particularly health professionals have to improve health and survival for males and females.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
5P01AG031719-04
Application #
8314017
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAG1-ZIJ-7 (J2))
Program Officer
Haaga, John G
Project Start
2009-09-30
Project End
2014-08-31
Budget Start
2012-09-01
Budget End
2013-08-31
Support Year
4
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$700,490
Indirect Cost
$93,015
Name
Duke University
Department
Miscellaneous
Type
Schools of Arts and Sciences
DUNS #
044387793
City
Durham
State
NC
Country
United States
Zip Code
27705
Tung, Jenny; Archie, Elizabeth A; Altmann, Jeanne et al. (2016) Cumulative early life adversity predicts longevity in wild baboons. Nat Commun 7:11181
Lea, Amanda J; Altmann, Jeanne; Alberts, Susan C et al. (2016) Resource base influences genome-wide DNA methylation levels in wild baboons (Papio cynocephalus). Mol Ecol 25:1681-96
Colchero, Fernando; Rau, Roland; Jones, Owen R et al. (2016) The emergence of longevous populations. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 113:E7681-E7690
Ahrenfeldt, Linda J; Lindahl-Jacobsen, Rune; Möller, Sören et al. (2016) Differences in Religiousness in Opposite-Sex and Same-Sex Twins in a Secular Society. Twin Res Hum Genet 19:35-46
Ahrenfeldt, Linda; Petersen, Inge; Johnson, Wendy et al. (2015) Academic performance of opposite-sex and same-sex twins in adolescence: A Danish national cohort study. Horm Behav 69:123-31
Fitzpatrick, Courtney L; Altmann, Jeanne; Alberts, Susan C (2015) Exaggerated sexual swellings and male mate choice in primates: testing the reliable indicator hypothesis in the Amboseli baboons. Anim Behav 104:175-185
Lea, Amanda J; Altmann, Jeanne; Alberts, Susan C et al. (2015) Developmental constraints in a wild primate. Am Nat 185:809-21
Galbany, Jordi; Tung, Jenny; Altmann, Jeanne et al. (2015) Canine length in wild male baboons: maturation, aging and social dominance rank. PLoS One 10:e0126415
Ahrenfeldt, Linda J; Skytthe, Axel; Möller, Sören et al. (2015) Risk of Sex-Specific Cancers in Opposite-Sex and Same-Sex Twins in Denmark and Sweden. Cancer Epidemiol Biomarkers Prev 24:1622-8
Franz, Mathias; McLean, Emily; Tung, Jenny et al. (2015) Self-organizing dominance hierarchies in a wild primate population. Proc Biol Sci 282:

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