Core B is as an administrative and database management core that will serve all four projects. This core will provide two vital functions which are essential to the research program. First, the core will provide program- specific administrative support including coordinating interactions between projects, organizing regular monthly meetings of all the project leaders and personnel, overseeing expenditures, and organizing all scientific advisory board meetings. The second main function of this core is to generate and maintain a web database for entry and compilation of data on cell populations in different tissue sites by all project groups by customization using Chemcart(TM), an existing software platform in the CCTI. These datasets will then be collated and uploaded at discrete points in the project to ImmPort, an NIAID-supported Immunology Database and Analysis Portal, to make the novel results and findings from this program on human tissue immune responses freely available and accessible to the scientific community at large. The successful integration of projects and data will depend on an effective core supporting all projects together.

Public Health Relevance

The goal of the research program is a novel examination of human immune cells in tissue sites where immune responses are initiated and maintained, using a unique tissue resource of the Program. The administrative and database core is essential for the coordination of investigators and maintenance of a database for all projects to enter their unique datasets to be made available to the immunology community.

National Institute of Health (NIH)
National Institute of Allergy and Infectious Diseases (NIAID)
Research Program Projects (P01)
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Special Emphasis Panel (ZAI1-QV-I)
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Columbia University
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