The primary responsibility of the Administrative Core is to provide the structure that maximizes the ability of each Project to complete its aims and ensure that "the whole is greater than the sum of the parts." In our experience in the first cycle of the P01, the core function has been indispensable in organizing meetings, facilitating interactions, and aiding in communication with NCI for annual reports. Thus, the core provides a highly significant function to the successful completion of the projects. A second responsibility of the Administrative Core is to allow investigators to focus on the science" rather than on administrative issues. This includes proactive budgetary support, arranging meetings, facilitating material transfers, supporting animal protocols and protocols that require IRB approval. Finally, the Administrative Core is structured to analyze the progress of all aspects of the P01 to allow for flexibility in the support of specific projects based on their progress over time. The administration of the P01, while under the directorship of one overall Leader, is a shared responsibility between the Core Leader, the P01 steering committee, the advisory boards, and the institution.

Public Health Relevance

The Administrative Core is a critical component of the P01 that allows for maximal effort of the Project Leaders and Core Directors to focus on team science. It provides service specific to the P01 that is not otherwise available within the OSUCCC and provides administrative, organizational, and fiscal structure to the group facilitating team science.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
5P01CA124570-07
Application #
8697760
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZCA1)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
Budget End
Support Year
7
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
Ohio State University
Department
Type
DUNS #
City
Columbus
State
OH
Country
United States
Zip Code
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