The mission of the High-Throughput Screening and Chemical Library (HTSCL) Core is to support the high-throughput screening, medicinal chemistry, automated microscopy and image analysis needs of the individual Projects. The Burnham Institute for Medical Research (BIMR) has collaborated with neighboring academic institutions to establish the San Diego Center for Chemical Genomics (SDCCG). The SDCCG will provide the projects access to state-of-the-art robotics and instrumentation for HTS for the purpose of discovering novel therapeutics for Parkinson's disease (PD), which will be a major function of Core E. HTS will be conducted in vitro against biochemical targets or cellular responses (Projects 2 3, and 4). A second major function of the core will be the automated acquisition and analysis of images of cells to quantify marker or phenotypic responses (Projects 2 and 3) using the sophisticated and proprietary automated microscopy platforms and algorithms developed within the center. In addition, the core will assume the responsibility of converting primary validated hits to leads through medicinal chemistry and nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR)-based and computational modeling strategies for compound optimization (Projects 2, 3, and 4). Core E will provide these functions for the Parkinson's Disease (PD) researchers in this Center.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences (NIEHS)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
5P01ES016738-05
Application #
8377588
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZES1-LWJ-G)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2012-07-01
Budget End
2013-06-30
Support Year
5
Fiscal Year
2012
Total Cost
$137,486
Indirect Cost
$61,783
Name
Sanford-Burnham Medical Research Institute
Department
Type
DUNS #
020520466
City
La Jolla
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
92037
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