The aim of the Core is to provide support and enhance the progress, productivity, cost-effectiveness, and outcome of the three research projects. The research projects focus on human and mouse genetic approaches to uncover genes for non-syndromic conotruncal heart defects (CTDs). All of the projects will utilize the Core, as it will have a fundamental role in administrating the Program. The Core will also help in human subject recruitment. It will recruit new 22q11 DS subjects and their parents for expanding the CNV landscape and to provide a replication of the GWAS, as proposed in Project 1. In addition, investigators in the Core, will oversee evolving clinical phenotyping. Specifically, Project 3 depends on an up to date understanding of the 22q11 DS phenotype and how it relates to non-syndromic malformations. The "phenotyping center" for which the Core in part serves, will provide essential intellectual guidance in areas of clinical human genetics. Finally, the core will make decisions as to which research site will carry out genomic assays including Affymetrix 6.0 arrays (Project 1), genotyping (Projects 1 and 2), sequence capture and next generation sequencing (NGS;Projects 1 and 2). The Core will negotiate best pricing and services when they are needed. The core will also organize travel for the Pi's for semimonthly meetings and travel to the NICHD Structural Birth Defects meeting in Washington DC.

Public Health Relevance

Relevance: The program to discover genes for cardiac outflow development and disease will help to develop future therapeutics for treatment. The goal of the core is to help recruit human subjects with the 22q11.2 deletion and to support Projects 1, 2 and 3 administratively.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
5P01HD070454-04
Application #
8700165
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZHD1)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
Budget End
Support Year
4
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
Albert Einstein College of Medicine
Department
Type
DUNS #
City
Bronx
State
NY
Country
United States
Zip Code
10461
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