The main purpose of Core A is to provide essential administrative support for all program-related activities and to interface with the National Institutes of Health, the University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC) administration, the UMMC Grants and Contracts office, the Department of Physiology and other departments represented in the Program Project Grant (PPG), and the investigators of the PPG. The Program Director is responsible for the scientific and financial management of the program and will be assisted by the Co-Director. The administrative staff of Core A is responsible for purchasing and fiscal management, preparation of manuscripts and posters for national meetings, interfacing with UMMC Human Resources department on personnel issues, program-related travel by the investigators and visits by invited consultants and speakers, and reports to the National Institutes of Health. The Administrative Core also disseminates important information to the program investigators, organizes scientific meetings and seminars related to the PPG, and coordinates assessment of research progress by the Internal and External Advisory Committees. The members of the Internal Advisory Board are leaders of major academic units at UMMC and will assess progress and review the direction of the PPG on a regular basis and will help develop strong liaisons between PPG investigators and key clinical and basic science departments. The External Advisory Board consists of outstanding scientists from other institutions who have expertise that will help advance the goals of the PPG; they will provide periodic assessment of the PPG scientific progress and meet with PPG investigators and the Internal Advisory Board each year. The Administrative Core has centralized many of the day to day business and administrative operations, improving the efficiency and cost-effectiveness of the PPG.

Public Health Relevance

CORE A - ADMINISTRATIVE CORE NARRATIVE Obesity and its cardiovascular and metabolic consequences, including hypertension, are major health issues affecting a large fraction of the US population. This Program Project Grant will provide new information about the underlying mechanisms by which obesity contributes to increased blood pressure and metabolic disorders in experimental models that are highly relevant to common, and difficult to treat, forms of human hypertension caused by obesity, preeclampsia, and postmenopausal hyperandrogenemia. Core A will provide essential administrative support for all program-related activities and to interface with the National Institutes of Health, the University of Mississippi Medical Center (UMMC) administration, the UMMC Grants and Contracts office, the Department of Physiology and other departments represented in the Program Project Grant (PPG), and the investigators of the PPG. The Administrative Core also disseminates important information to PPG investigators, organizes scientific meetings and seminars related to the program, and coordinates assessment of research progress by the Internal and External Advisory Committees. The Administrative Core has centralized many of the day to day business and administrative operations, improving the efficiency and cost- effectiveness of the PPG.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Type
Research Program Projects (P01)
Project #
2P01HL051971-21
Application #
8742633
Study Section
Heart, Lung, and Blood Program Project Review Committee (HLBP)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-08-01
Budget End
2015-05-31
Support Year
21
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
Indirect Cost
Name
University of Mississippi Medical Center
Department
Type
DUNS #
City
Jackson
State
MS
Country
United States
Zip Code
39216
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