This Core will be housed at the Cincinnati Children's Hospital Medical Center within the Division of Molecular Cardiovascular Biology. Although spatially separated from members of the Program Project Grant team. Dr. Robbins has been collaborating with them for years and supplies the current Program Project Grant investigators and Cores with both mice and protein fragments. The Core will be critical for the studies proposed in all of the Program Project Grant's Component's as it will be responsible for the design, production, colony maintenance and shipment of ail transgenic mice that are proposed by the Program Project Grant's investigators and Core B. The Core will also produce the different proteins, protein fragments and antibodies needed for the in vitro and isolated systems studies. As such, it forms an integral part of the Program Project Grant's foundation. The Core's responsibilities are: ? Design and build all constructs for bacterial- or Sacu/o-based MyBP-C protein and protein fragment production. ? Grow and purify all protein fragments in sufficient quantities to satisfy the investigators'needs ? Design, build and generate all transgenic mice that are proposed in the Program Project Grant. ? Maintain sufficient numbers of all lines in barrier facilities so that they can be distributed as needed to the investigators as well as to other scientists who request them. ? Serve as a central clearing house for the preparation, maintenance and quality control of the cMyBP-C specific antibodies ? Maintain an adequate inventory of all of the above and arrange for convenient shipping to the individual investigators or Core Leaders.

National Institute of Health (NIH)
National Heart, Lung, and Blood Institute (NHLBI)
Research Program Projects (P01)
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Heart, Lung, and Blood Initial Review Group (HLBP)
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University of Vermont & St Agric College
United States
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Lee, Kyounghwan; Harris, Samantha P; Sadayappan, Sakthivel et al. (2015) Orientation of myosin binding protein C in the cardiac muscle sarcomere determined by domain-specific immuno-EM. J Mol Biol 427:274-86
Sandri, Marco; Robbins, Jeffrey (2014) Proteotoxicity: an underappreciated pathology in cardiac disease. J Mol Cell Cardiol 71:3-10
Rainer, Peter P; Hao, Scarlett; Vanhoutte, Davy et al. (2014) Cardiomyocyte-specific transforming growth factor ? suppression blocks neutrophil infiltration, augments multiple cytoprotective cascades, and reduces early mortality after myocardial infarction. Circ Res 114:1246-57
Gupta, Manish K; Robbins, Jeffrey (2014) Post-translational control of cardiac hemodynamics through myosin binding protein C. Pflugers Arch 466:231-6
Seo, Kinya; Rainer, Peter P; Shalkey Hahn, Virginia et al. (2014) Combined TRPC3 and TRPC6 blockade by selective small-molecule or genetic deletion inhibits pathological cardiac hypertrophy. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 111:1551-6
Mun, Ji Young; Previs, Michael J; Yu, Hope Y et al. (2014) Myosin-binding protein C displaces tropomyosin to activate cardiac thin filaments and governs their speed by an independent mechanism. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 111:2170-5
Yang, Shixin; Barbu-Tudoran, Lucian; Orzechowski, Marek et al. (2014) Three-dimensional organization of troponin on cardiac muscle thin filaments in the relaxed state. Biophys J 106:855-64
Craig, Roger; Lee, Kyoung Hwan; Mun, Ji Young et al. (2014) Structure, sarcomeric organization, and thin filament binding of cardiac myosin-binding protein-C. Pflugers Arch 466:425-31
Tanner, Bertrand C W; Wang, Yuan; Robbins, Jeffrey et al. (2014) Kinetics of cardiac myosin isoforms in mouse myocardium are affected differently by presence of myosin binding protein-C. J Muscle Res Cell Motil 35:267-78
Wang, Xuejun; Robbins, Jeffrey (2014) Proteasomal and lysosomal protein degradation and heart disease. J Mol Cell Cardiol 71:16-24

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