Administrative Core. The Administrative Core is composed of Dr, William Maixner (Program Director) and Dr. Richard Gracely (Associate Program Director). This Core will oversee the administrative activities of the Program and provide assistance to the individual subprojects in administrative matters. Most importantly, it will provide an infrastructure for the integration of findings from the individual subprojects for attainment of the Program's goals. Accordingly, the specific aims and funcfion of this core are to: 1. Coordinate the administrafive activifies of the Program and the individual subprojects (e.g., assist in the management of budgets and personnel). 2. Promote a scholariy environment by coordinafing the Program's seminar series and visits by external scientists. 3. Meet weekly and review administrative issues and concerns of the Program. 4. Meet monthly with the principal investigators and core directors to discuss progress and problems encountered by the individualsubprojects. 5. Assemble every six months Program investigators, postdoctoral fellows, graduate research assistants, consultants as available, and staff to (i) identify concordant and discordant research findings among subprojects, (ii) evaluate the Program's working hypotheses, (iii) determine if changes or refinements in protocols are needed, and (iv) promote creative thinking and reinforce interactions among the Program team members. 6. Coordinate annual meetings of the Program's External Scientific Advisory Committees with the entire invesfigative team.

National Institute of Health (NIH)
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke (NINDS)
Research Program Projects (P01)
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Application #
Study Section
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke Initial Review Group (NSD)
Project Start
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University of North Carolina Chapel Hill
Chapel Hill
United States
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