Persistent disparities exist in routine immunizations and immunizations in a public health emergency such as the H1N1 pandemic between Black and White adults for vaccine preventable diseases. Research has identified numerous factors that contribute to but do not account fully for the disparities. Further research is needed to understand attitudes, cultural beliefs, and other psychosocial factors that influence vaccine behavior. We will identify new factors affecting immunization disparities and test the effectiveness of new communication components on intent to get a vaccine. Methods include: 1) focus groups and belief elicitation interviews to uncover psychosocial factors and cultural variables;2) construction of new quantitative items and cognitive interviews assessing those items;3) a national pilot survey with 200 Blacks and Whites to validate the instrument;4) a nationally representative survey of 1600 Blacks and Whites;5) translation of results into communication components;and 6) testing those components with 200 Black adults.

Public Health Relevance

Public acceptance of vaccines for vaccine preventable diseases is critical to reduce morbidity and mortality from routine infectious diseases such as seasonal influenza, pneumonia and others. Public willingness to take a vaccine in a public helath emergency such as a pandemic is esstential. This research addresses the persistent problem of disparities between Black and White adults that places Blacks at higher risk.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Minority Health and Health Disparities (NIMHD)
Type
Exploratory Grants (P20)
Project #
5P20MD006737-03
Application #
8687517
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZMD1-MLS)
Project Start
Project End
Budget Start
2014-03-01
Budget End
2015-02-28
Support Year
3
Fiscal Year
2014
Total Cost
$174,660
Indirect Cost
$58,141
Name
University of Maryland College Park
Department
Type
DUNS #
790934285
City
College Park
State
MD
Country
United States
Zip Code
20742
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