This renewal proposal for the RAND Roybal Center for Financial Decision Making will continue and expand upon the work that we have already done to improve our understanding of how people reach decisions about issues affecting their economic status in old age, and develop tools that can help people align these decisions with their long-term objectives. We will continue to develop a research program focused on how people collect and process information, how they interpret the features of alternatives, how they think about risks and probabilities, how they trade off between the present and the future, what their preferences are, and how well they match their decisions to those preferences;weak links in this process are used to draw implications for better education, information provision or other mechanisms to help people make decisions that better serve them in old age. To that end, we will maintain the American Life Panel, a panel of 1500 respondents (growing to 3000 during the first year of the project period) surveyed about bi-weekly via the Internet. In addition we will develop a Qualitative Research Facility for conducting focus groups and cognitive interviews. We will develop decision support software and extensively use visual aids and graphical designs, thus fully exploiting the advantages offered by the Internet. We will fund pilot projects with a specific substantive focus on economic status in old age and high potential translational value for policymakers, NGOs and/or commercial entities. We will also promote and coordinate research without P30 Roybal Center support on issues that may help us understand individual decision making related to economic status in old age;and promote the use of the Center's Internet panel and Qualitiative Research Facility by these and other research projects. The Roybal Center will work closely with other centers and projects to achieve maximal synergies.

Public Health Relevance

This research project will use internet surveys, focus groups, cognitive interviews, and experiments to develop strategies that help people make better decisions related to economic well-being at older ages.

Agency
National Institute of Health (NIH)
Institute
National Institute on Aging (NIA)
Type
Center Core Grants (P30)
Project #
7P30AG024962-10
Application #
8531087
Study Section
Special Emphasis Panel (ZAG1-ZIJ-3 (M2))
Program Officer
Phillips, John
Project Start
2004-09-30
Project End
2014-08-31
Budget Start
2013-09-30
Budget End
2014-08-31
Support Year
10
Fiscal Year
2013
Total Cost
$421,784
Indirect Cost
$157,797
Name
University of Southern California
Department
Miscellaneous
Type
Schools of Arts and Sciences
DUNS #
072933393
City
Los Angeles
State
CA
Country
United States
Zip Code
90089
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Bruine de Bruin, Wändi; Strough, JoNell; Parker, Andrew M (2014) Getting older isn't all that bad: better decisions and coping when facing "sunk costs". Psychol Aging 29:642-7
Barcellos, Silvia Helena; Wuppermann, Amelie C; Carman, Katherine Grace et al. (2014) Preparedness of Americans for the Affordable Care Act. Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A 111:5497-502